Help us to beat cancer

Cancer

Thanks to your support, we are pioneering the early diagnosis and effective treatment of a wide-range of cancers. Research made possible by your generosity towards the Circles of influence campaign has helped to save the lives of children and adults, from our local communities to Sub-Saharan Africa. We have improved breast cancer survival by 30%, developed technology to eradicate prostate cancer tumours, and reduced the risk of bladder cancer recurrence by a third. Help us to continue to save lives.

Professor Paul Moss, Head of Cancer Sciences "Worldwide, 10 million people each year are diagnosed with cancer. In the U.K., 1 in 3 will develop the disease. We now have the opportunity to change this"

It is predicted that over one in three of us will develop cancer during our lifetime and that it will be the cause of death for almost a quarter of the population. The School of Cancer Sciences at Birmingham is playing a major role in the global effort to transform these statistics within a generation. Earlier and more accurate diagnosis is critical to survival rates, and we need to develop new drugs, new treatments, and undertake clinical trials that will help to save lives. Your support is vital to our work.

Birmingham has a track record of internationally respected research, and we were the first university to become a Cancer Research UK Super Centre. We are involved in partnerships with the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Birmingham Children's Hospital that enable us to reach patients faster.

We are making breakthrough after breakthrough, leading to improved prognoses and increased survival rates. To do this, we rely on your sustained support. There is no more personal way to support cancer research than by supporting our scientists and staff in the laboratories and clinics.

To support our fight against cancer, give today or contact Sally Brooks [+44(0)121 414 7957].

Dr. Jessica Edwards, Brain Tumour Research Associate, funded by Ric Traynor (BCom Accounting and Finance, 1981) and his wife Zena through The Traynor Foundation "The more people are made aware of brain tumours and donate to support brain cancer research, the more patients will have a fighting chance."