row test tubesBirmingham excels in critical health and lifestyle research. With your support we can have still greater and faster impact on cancer, obesity, healthy ageing and brain injury. 

In 2003 the Medical School embarked on an ambitious project to fund and build a new Centre for Medical Education including a high-tech lecture theatre, student social and learning spaces and seminar rooms.Thanks to the support of trusts, including primarily the Wolfson Foundation, and hundreds of medical alumni, the £2.5 million needed to fund the new building was achieved. 

The Wolfson Centre opened in 2005 and is today regarded as one of the UK’s best medical teaching and learning spaces, helping to ensure the best quality, best trained medical professionals for the future and contributing to a high quality of medical care in the UK and worldwide. 

We have also recently completed work on the Medical School Foyer and Barnes Library ground floor refurbishment project, which was generously supported by alumni of the College of Medical and Dental Sciences and Dr Doug Ellis OBE. For more information on this project, please visit the Medical School and Barnes Library appeal website.

Cancer research

Together we can discover innovative treatments for many forms of cancer.    

It is predicted that over one in three of us will develop cancer during our lifetime and that it will be the cause of death for almost a quarter of the population. The School of Cancer Sciences at Birmingham is playing a major role in the global effort to transform these statistics within a generation.

Professor Paul Moss, Head of School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham “Our understanding of cancer biology and how this leads to the development of new treatments is improving at an impressive rate and it is vital that we maintain this momentum. Undergraduates entering the University are now the first generation to have a very realistic hope of witnessing the control of this disease.”

Earlier and more accurate diagnosis is critical to the survival rates of many cancer suffererers and there is also a constant need to develop new treatments that will improve or save the lives of cancer patients.

To tackle this worldwide health issue, a focused programme of innovative research married with clinical trials is needed, supported by state-of-the-art equipment and world-class staff.

Researchers are currently working on treating an aggressive form of Lymphoma, which is prevalent amongst children in Africa. Burkitt's Lymphoma doubles in size every few days and whilst cure rates are greater than 90% in developed countries, the developing world cannot treat this cancer alongside the toxic effects of chemotherapy. For more information on this research, please visit Treating Cancer In Africa

Birmingham has a track record of internationally respected research and is the first university to become a Cancer Research UK Super Centre. Your support can help us to ensure our research findings move from laboratory to patient as quickly as possible, leading to improved prognoses and increased survival rates.

For further information, contact Matt Mangan +44 (0)121 4148640

You can also Give now.

 

 

Obesity research

We may be the first generation in history to see children die before their parents.

Help us halt the obesity epidemic.

Obesity is a heavy accumulation of fat in your body that reduces your life expectancy and increases your risk of a number of life-threatening diseases such as cancer, kidney failure, heart disease and diabetes. To ascertain whether you are obese, doctors use the body mass index (BMI), which compares your weight against your height. You are clinically obese if your BMI is 30 or higher.

Worldwide, 300 million adults are clinically obese. Immediate action is needed to slow down and eventually halt the obesity epidemic, thereby reducing the huge burden on the NHS and UK economy.

Centre for Obesity Research

The Centre will pioneer new treatments for obesity and its life-threatening effects and conduct high-impact PhD-led research into the causes of obesity and its complications in adults and children from different ethnic groups. It will also implement motivational strategies for healthier lifestyles.

To establish the centre, initial funding is needed for bespoke research programmes and for four PhD studentships to undertake new collaborative projects across key research areas.

For further information, contact Matt Mangan +44 (0)121 4148640

You can also Give now.

 

 

Healthy ageing research

Help us ensure that old age is enjoyed not endured.

By the year 2020, one fifth of the UK population will be over the age of 65 and there is an urgent need to develop ways to improve immune health in older adults.

On average, men suffer poor health for the final six years of life; this increases to 11 years for women. A key reason for this is the profoundly negative effect of ageing on the immune system, with respiratory infections such as pneumonia a leading cause of death in old age and a significant cause of frailty in previously healthy older adults.

Ageless

AgeLess, the Birmingham Centre for Healthy Ageing Research, will build on the University’s existing excellence in immunology and infection to develop novel research that both significantly improves quality of life in old age and informs and influences future government health policy.

Funding is needed for a research manager and key laboratory equipment, plus initial support to develop ten major research projects.

For further information, contact Hannah Eno +44 (0)121 414 7860

You can also Give now.

 

 

Brain injury rehabilitation research

Help us develop novel treatments to rehabilitate people with brain injury.

There are around half a million cases of brain injury and degenerative change diagnosed in the UK every year.

Pain, distress and a dramatically reduced quality of life are among the outcomes for those diagnosed with brain injury (e.g. stroke, head trauma) or degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The treatment for such patients represents an enormous burden on carers and the Health Service but the quality and availability of long-term support is variable.

There is an urgent need to translate neuroscientific research into improved rehabilitation for brain injury and degenerative change patients, and innovative treatments to improve their long-term quality of life.

CN-CR Centre

The Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics (CN–CR) Centre will be a unique new facility, bringing together the University’s world-class research in these areas to focus on rehabilitation.

For further information, contact: Hannah Eno +44 (0)121 414 7860

You can also Give now.

 

 

Wolfson Centre for Medical Education – a completed project

In 2003 the Medical School embarked on an ambitious project to fund and build a new Centre for Medical Education. This included a high-tech lecture theatre, student social and learning spaces and seminar rooms.

Thanks to the support of trusts, including primarily the Wolfson Foundation, and hundreds of medical alumni, the £2.5 million needed was raised.

The Wolfson Centre opened in 2005 and is today regarded as one of the UK’s best medical teaching and learning spaces, helping to ensure the best quality, best trained medical professionals for the future and contributing to a high quality of medical care in the UK and worldwide.

Professor Ian Booth, Dean of Medicine and Project Champion "The Wolfson Centre for Medical Education has transformed the centre of the Medical School. It now provides state-of-the-art facilities at the very heart of our activities."