Alumni authors: G-I

Many of our alumni are published authors. If you have written a book and would like to appear on these pages, please let us know via alumnicommunications@contacts.bham.ac.uk

G

Dr Geoffrey Gibbons (LLB Law, 1948)

The Political Career of Thomas Wriothesley, First Earl of Southampton, 1505-1550 , Henry VIII's last Chancellor , 2001. Edwin Mellen Press (ISBN No 0-7734-7415-3)

Thomas Wriothesley was a pivotal figure in the political and religious upheavals of the 1530s and 1540s, yet to date his role has not been considered in any depth. This work rectifies that deficiency, and in the process illuminates further the workings of mid-Tudor government and politics. Wriothesley worked with both Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell, carried out Cromwell's plans for the re-organization of the privy council and other administrative offices, had a hand in the monastic dissolution and in the suppression of the Pilgrimage of Grace. For the rest of Henry's reign, Wriothesley was the conduit through which the king's wishes were made known. He held the office of lord chancellor into the reign of Edward.

Fawzia Gilani-Williams (MPhil [Art] Islamic Studies, 2000)

Fawzia is the author of over 40 children's story books, mostly on the topic of Eid. She is currently working on her Islamic Fairytale Series, published by Kube UK, of which Cinderella, Snow White and Sleeping Beauty have been published. Her latest title in the series, Beauty and the Beast, is in progress.

For the past 13 years, Fawzia has been studying Islamic education in North America. She is also working on a PhD – her research concerns character education and children's literature.

Tony Giles (MA American and Canadian Studies, 2003)

Seeing the World My Way:A totally blind and partially deaf guy's global adventures , Silverwood Books, 2009.

Seeing the World My Way follows Tony Giles’ journey of hedonism and thrill-seeking adventure as he travels across North America, Asia and Australasia. Full of drama, danger and discovery, this fascinating travel biography is a young blind man’s view of the world as he sets out to achieve his dream, dealing with disability whilst living life to the limit.

From bungee jumping in New Zealand to booze filled nights out in New Orleans, Seeing the World My Way is a no-holds-barred account that is certainly not for the faint hearted. Travel the world in a whole new way with Tony Giles’ frank, honest and exhilarating romp through one adrenaline-fuelled experience after another.

Professor John Gold (MSocSc Urban and Regional Studies, 1972; PhD Urban and Regional Studies, 1988) 

The Practice of Modernism , Routledge, 2007. 

In this sequel to his widely-acclaimed book The Experience of Modernism (1997), John Gold continues his detailed enquiry into the Modern Movement's involvement in urban planning and city design. The Practice of Modernism provides an important new analysis of the role played by modern architects in the recent transformation of cities that will interest urban and architectural historians, urban geographers, planners and all concerned with understanding the recent history of the contemporary city.

Margaret Gold (BA Geography 1970)

Olympic Cities - Edited by John Gold and Margaret Gold, Routledge, 2007. 

Olympic Cities provides the first full overview of the changing relationship between cities and the Olympic events since 1896. With eighteen specially commissioned and original essays written by a team of distinguished authors from the UK and overseas, it explores the historical experience of staging the Olympics from the point of view of the host city. As controversy over the growing size and expense of the Olympics continues unabated, this book's incisive and timely assessment of the Games' development and the complex agendas that host cities attach to the event will be essential reading not only for urban and sports historians, urban geographers, planners and all concerned with understanding the relationship between cities and culture, but for anyone with an interest in the staging of mega-events.

Richard Gray (BSc Psychology 1991, MSc Psychology 1994)

The Importance of Being Drunk, Pen Press Ltd of Brighton, 2008.

Businessman Alan Bland is facing retirement and has devised an ingenious plan for the future of the family firm. The question is: how do Eddie and Martin - his drunken, layabout sons and heirs - fit into his manipulative plot? In drinking holes from Brighton to Newcastle this hilarious story follows Eddie and Martin on their endless benders - where breakfast is the contents of a hipflask and, many pints later, dinner is a packet of crisps and a pickled egg.

This is a funny yet tragic tale of family ties, corporate tricks and lives dominated by alcohol.

H

Gregory Hadley (MA English, 1997)

Field of Spears: The Last Mission of the Jordan Crew , Paulownia Press, 2007. 

What happens to ordinary people in times of war? This question is explored through the true story of a B-29 crew shot down over a rural Japanese village on 20 July 1945. Presented in narrative form, Hadley weaves a gripping tale drawn from recently declassified historical documents, never before seen photographs, and interviews with both Japanese eyewitnesses and survivors of the B-29 crew. Field of Spears is not simply the story of an incident that took place over half a century ago. It is a chilling reminder of what awaits today’s soldiers when they fall into the waiting arms of terrified and angry civilians.

Margaret Handford (BMus Music, 1987)

Sounds Unlikely: Music in Birmingham?   Brewin Books, 2006.

Birmingham's present musical eminence is principally associated with Simon Rattle's brilliant seasons with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra from 1980-1999. This exciting and very prestigious development was in fact a transformation, based on a solid musical foundation built up through the endeavour of many interesting and active musicians and music lovers over a period of several centuries. Moving through the ages, from the chantries of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, to the busy eighteenth century organists whose enterprise led to the great nineteenth century Musical Festivals and culminating in the age of the orchestra in the twentieth, the book describes how the foundation was laid. This is an account of how, with no single architect but many men of vision, the present day much admired edifice has been established.

Peter Handford (LLB Law, 1968)

Limitation of Actions: The Australian Law,  Lawbook Co. 2004. 

This book deals with the rules governing time limits on starting legal proceedings, bringing together the differing laws of all eight Australian states and territories.

Mullany and Handford's Tort Liability for Psychiatric Damage , 2nd Edition, Lawbook Co Sydney, 2006

Professor Clive Harber (PhD Education, 1982)

Isn't That Dangerous? African Travels among Academics and Other Wild Animals, Educational Heretics Press, 2009.

Clive Harber spent over twenty years working, researching and teaching in Africa, always keeping detailed accounts of his experiences. After publishing several academic books, he has changed tone and produced a humorous travel book on sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr John Heathcote (PhD Geological Sciences, 1981)

Natural Inorganic Chemistry in Relation to Groundwater , Clarendon Oxford, 1985, with J W Lloyd

An introduction to the use of groundwater chemistry in understanding water resources, from the background to the things that are measured, to their significance in deducing the origins of water and thus sustainability. The book is aimed at engineers and hydrogeologists. The School of Earth Sciences at Birmingham led major developments in the understanding of major British and overseas aquifers in the 1970s and 80s using the ideas presented in this book.

Urban Rivers - Our Inheritance and Future, IWA Publishing , 2002, with G Petts and D Martin

Urban Rivers provides an illustrated overview of the effects of urbanisation on the aquatic environment, potential solutions to the resulting problems, and new opportunities for the regeneration of urban streams and rivers, and of land along their corridors and of adjacent urban areas. The book is written to be accessible to a broad audience and should provide a stimulating and informative introduction to the subject for all those concerned with the urban river environment.

Dr Ruth Hellier-Tinoco (BA Music Drama and Dance, 1983)

Embodying Mexico:Tourism, Nationalism and Performance , Oxford University Press 2011

Embodying Mexico focuses on The Dance of the Old Men and Night of the Dead of Lake Pátzcuaro, examining them in light of the fascinating web of political and poetic signification associated with their roles as icons of Mexicanness.

Wendy Henningsson (BA German Studies, 1957)

Home Hills & Beyond, Nork Books 2004

An interest in learning to speak foreign languages decided the path Wendy's life would take. However, she did not know at the age of nine when she sat with her father on the Home Hills overlooking the North Sea, that one day she would settle in a land beyond that horizon. Based on diaries, letters and photo-albums, Wendy here describes her childhood in England and how she adapted to life in Sweden.

Dr Julie Hepworth (PhD Psycology, 1993)

The Social Construction of Anorexia Nervose , Sage Publications

In this wide-ranging book, Julie Hepworth casts a critical light on our contemporary understanding of anorexia nervosa. She locates contemporary discourses of anorexia nervosa within their historical context, showing how current practices continue to be influenced by medicine, psychology, ideology and politics. She argues that anorexia nervosa must be considered within the political, social and gendered relationships that continue to contribute to its definition. The book demonstrates the need for a new conceptualisation of anorexia nervosa which would draw on the insights of discourse theory, feminism and postmodernism to create new understandings of anorexia nervosa within contemporary health care practices.

Brian Hirst (BPhil(Ed) Education, 1979)

Rag-Oyle Town Family , YPD Books 2011

In this funny and moving memoir, Brian Hirst pays tribute to his family, and the community in which he was raised, portraying the struggle they faced – and still face – maintaining their culture and sense of worth and dignity, sometimes against fearsome odds.

He vividly recalls a world that has disappeared – the world of “lower working class” people in the shoddy mill town of Batley, West Yorkshire, and brings us up-to-date with life in the family and community today.

Jennifer Hope (BA Creative Writing, 2005)

Petrolhead , Oversteps Books, 2010

Petrolhead is a collection of poems by Jenny Hope, an administrator at the University of Worcester, who's taken a degree in creative writing. Her poems are about everything from tarmac to nature, and in particular, trees. The book has endorsements from David Hart and Roz Goddard, both former Birmingham Poet Laureates.

Reginald Horsman (BA History, 1952)

Feast or Famine, University of Missouri Press, 2008

When settlers began advancing across North America, they endured great hardships but for the most part did not go hungry. With a seemingly inexhaustible supply of wildlife and an abundance of vegetation, even the poorest lived comfortably.

 Feast or Famine is the first comprehensive account of food and drink in the winning of the West, describing the sustenance of successive generations of western pioneers. Drawing on journals of settlers and travellers - as well as a lifetime of research on the American West - Reginald Horsman examines more than one hundred years of history, from the first advance of explorers into the Mississippi valley to the movements of ranchers and farmers onto the Great Plains, recording not only the components of their diets but food-preparation techniques as well.

Jessica Howe (BA Byzantine and Ottoman Studies, 1996)

One Stop Wedding Kit, 2007

Hailed by the New York Times as "Unquestionably the source of information for any bride and groom to be", The One Stop Wedding Kit is the stand-alone guide that reveals all you need to plan and accomplish the perfect wedding. It's chock-full of insider tips for organising every aspect of your big day but still small enough to fit in your handbag so you can carry it to appointments.

Wayne Howell (BSc Physics, 1984)

Rock Solid Ethernet, Entertainment Technology Press

The book is intended for all those involved in the use of Ethernet in a harsh environment, and the bulk of it is aimed at Entertainment Technology – one of the harshest environments available. It will be useful for both the experienced network engineer and the DMX512 tech making a first exploration into networks, and it is intended to address this new subject at a number of levels.

It is relevant to end users and system specifiers, system installers, manufacturers and developers, and has been organised in such as way that each group of users has a specific chapter but can dip into other sections for additional reference.

Trevor Iskander (MBChB Medicine, 1954)

When Fears Frustrate Contentment , Gegensatz Press 2012

Self-help for conquering stress, anxiety, and fear. The Desensitisation Hierarchy Method, described in this book, is a tool for managing change, but its users will always be in charge of deciding both what changes they want to make, and how much they want to do at any one time. The method is a bit like an automobile, a means of travel, the driver deciding where to go, and at what speed.