International Studies in Education MEd/MA/BPhil/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate/Advanced Certificate

International Studies in Education

This programme is for people who are interested in taking an international and comparative perspective on educational issues. The International Studies in Education programme is offered with five pathways (the general International Studies in Education, Management and Policy, Intercultural Communication, Citizenship Education and Education and Development) which share the same core themes and outcomes.  However each pathway has a distinctive focus and different compulsory modules. This programme may be of interest to teachers, headteachers/principals, education administrators, and those working with non-governmental organisations and international agencies that play a role in formal and non-formal education. It will enable you to have a critical understanding of key debates surrounding education as an international issue and to make analytical comparisons between educational issues in different contexts, including your own.

pdficonsmall Download a summary flier for the International Studies in Education programme (PDF, 198KB)

Course fact file

Type of Course: Continuing professional development, taught

Study Options: Full time, part time

Duration: MEd/MA – 1 year full-time, 3 years part-time; PGDip – 1 year full-time, 2 years part-time; PGCert – 1 year full-time/part-time; BPhil – 1 year full-time, 2 years part-time, AdCert – 1 year full-time/part-time

Start date: September

Contact

Dr Paul Lynch
Telephone 44 (0)121 414 6735 
Email   p.lynch@bham.ac.uk   

Programme Administrator

Alison Duggan
Telephone +44(0)121 415 8274
Email  pgteducation-enquiries@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Details

International Studies in Education: Students studying

This programme is designed for people who want to gain an international perspective on education. You will be studying with a wide range of people from different countries, with diverse career aspirations, and with varied levels of experience. What you will all have in common is an interest in education, and a desire to understand its functions in different parts of the world, and as a global phenomenon.

Programme Aims

  • Have a critical understanding of key debates surrounding education as an international issue
  • Make analytical comparisons between educational issues in different contexts, including your own

Global social justice is a theme of all strands of this programme.

Pathways

The International Studies in Education programme is offered with five specialist pathways. These pathways follow the same broad lines of the core programme, but each one has a different focus and different compulsory modules.

  • International Studies in Education
  • Management and Policy
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Citizenship Education
  • Education and Development

The Education and Development pathway is in collaboration with the International Development Department in the School of Government and Society.

pdficonsmall Download a summary flier for the Education and Development pathway (PDF, 180KB)

Level of Award

The level at which an individual is admitted to study on the programme will depend on their previous academic qualifications as well as their professional experience.

pdficonsmallDownload information on the different levels of the award (PDF opens new window)

You may also be interested in our Management of Special Education in Developing Countries programme

Why study this course

Lesego, Yanqi Hu and Happy Agbenyega discuss their lives as international students at the University of Birmingham and the skills and knowledge they have gained whilst here.

 

students
 Happy Agbeyega    Yanqi Hu
Happy Agbeyega   Yanqi Hu

Happy Agbenyega

What were you doing before you came to the University of Birmingham?

As a professionally trained school counselor, I was working as a Guidance and Counselling coordinator of school counselling activities in schools in the Dangme West District of Ghana.

What attracted you to this programme?

I was attracted to the international nature of the course after taking a close look at the course design that deals with the relevant global issues in Education such as the curriculum design in the global context, leadership skills, Professional and personal development skills, School observation, and Professional and personal development skills. As a trainer in the educational sector in my Country, I need to acquire more knowledge in those areas and be abreast with current global educational issues so that I would be able to transfer the knowledge to teachers in my Country.

What do you enjoy most about your course here at Birmingham?

I found the learning experience very interesting and thought provoking because in the first place, most issues in the course content are relevant to what we experience in real life situations. After going through the discipline, I acquired the practical skills that are required in leadership, interpersonal interactions, professional ethics, presentations or public speaking, observations, interactive studies, critical and analytical presentations and writings.
In addition, taking this course has helped me to realize the importance of having ethical obligation towards people outside my Country since I had the opportunity to interact and learn with people from different countries. Therefore I believe it is going to be easier for me to deliver my services anywhere in the globe because I learnt about how to belong and participate in a wider global community.

My lectures are my role models now because they are very enthusiastic about their work. By their example, I want to be more assertive, transparent, and very efficient when I go back to join the working force. 

What did you find challenging about the course?

What I initially found challenging was how to support my views with evidence and eliminate assumptions when writing assignments. Secondly it was quite difficult to combine weekly assignments, extra academic events with the writing of 4000 words term paper. However, when I discovered that they were all part of the leadership training skills we were supposed to acquire, I quickly adapted myself to it by planning and managing my time very well in order to meet deadlines for submitting assignments. Before the end of the first semester, I also mastered the style of critical and analytical way of writing.

What attributes should students possess?

I think students need to have organizational skills whereby they will have the ability to set priorities. Secondly, they should be able to identify distractive elements that will shift their focus from their academic goals. For example they should avoid unprofitable social activities such as unnecessary travels, night club activities etc. They should always plan ahead, set academic achievable goals so that they will be motivated by them.

Would you recommend this course to others and why?

I would highly recommend this University and particularly International Studies in Education for the following reasons: 

  1. I am convinced that the course has what it takes to mold people into responsible global citizen as well as a purposeful career oriented persons because during the period of study, they will discover skills that will make them socially confident and professionally competent. 
  2. I believe the core value of the course is for everyone irrespective of their ethnic background to be included, challenged and become successful. 
  3. We can see that the world is increasingly becoming complex; therefore, we need to prepare ourselves through international education so that we would be able to understand how to share our planet, communicate freely with each other world-wide, solve global common issues, respect each other’s views so that we can have a positive disposition towards helping each other globally. I can also testify that we International Studies Education students perceive themselves as change agents because we believe the skills and knowledge we have developed are going to help us to make a positive impact globally. 

Any advice for students?

I would advise students to get themselves very organized from the start of the program me by getting a work planner diary, separate files for each model assignment, draw up a personal study time table, and spend most of their time in the library. Secondly they should make sure they attend every function organized by school authorities since these activities are linked to the main course modules. 

What are your plans after you have graduated?

I have drawn up an action plan for the establishment of a learning and Counselling Center where I would organize training program me for teachers on issues relating to teaching and learning, professional and personal improvement, and counsel the youth on career education and personal-social problems.

Finally, if there was one thing you could have done differently over the course of your study what would it be?

Nothing else than to encourage stake-holders of education in Ghana to net-work with the University of Birmingham and the department of Education for them to introduce the International Studies in Education into Ghanaian Universities.

Yanqi Hu

 What were you doing before you came to the University of Birmingham?

Before I came to Birmingham, I studied teaching Chinese as a second language in China.

What attracted you to this programme?

The international aspect was the most attractive thing for me. The program says that students study educational issues from an international and comparative perspective. It seemed this program was ideal for me, a very curious young person who is interested in other cultures, especially the educational aspect.

What do you enjoy most about your course here at Birmingham?

Interculture communication is both an enjoyable experience and a challenge for me. On the course, people from all over the world get together, share ideas, and discuss. Sometimes I am inspired by my classmates’ opinions. Sometimes I have to try my best to discuss or explain my thinking.

What qualities do you think a student needs to have in order to be successful on the course?

Hard work is a significant factor if you want to achieve success on this course, because the students have to finish three 4000 words assignments every semester. Finishing the three assignments is a big challenge for the students especially the non-native English speakers.

Would you recommend this course to others?

Of course! Because the modules of this course are interesting and I enjoy the international atmosphere here. The staff in the School of Education are very nice and helpful.

Any advice for students?

Just come and enjoy. Additionally, work hard and submit assignments on time.

What are your plans after you have graduated?

I intend to get a job in an educational publishing company in China after graduation.

Modules

All students must take the compulsory module ‘Education as an International Issue’ and MEd and MA students must take the research methods module ‘Practitioner Inquiry in Education’. Information on the specific modules for each pathway may be found in the Learning and Teaching section

You will have the opportunity to learn more about each module and to make your selections in the first week of term. There are three terms each year; taught modules run in terms one and two. For MA students, your first term modules are fixed.

Education as an International Issue

Module code: 11 20807 (Level M); 11 20804 (Level H)

This module encourages analysis of your own and other national contexts from an international and comparative perspective. Participants develop an understanding of important theories and debates, such as: the relationship between education and national development; effects of globalisation; how ideology and culture influence education provision; models of education management. This module is a core and compulsory module for all students on International Studies in Education programmes. (Term 1)  

Aims

At the end of the module, Level H students will:

  • Have an understanding of key debates surrounding education as an international issue 
  • Be aware of relationships between education and society, the economy and politics 
  • Be able to see the implications of such debates and relationships for their own contexts 
  • Be aware of significant problems facing education in difficult circumstances internationally 
  • Be able to see the implications of key international issues in education for schools, curriculum and classrooms

At the end of the module, Level M students will: 

  • Have a critical understanding of the causes underlying the key debates surrounding education as an international issue
  • Have a theoretical understanding of the relationships between education and society, the economy and politics 
  • Be able to apply and contextualise such debates and relationships 
  • Be able to critically analyse and evaluate significant problems facing education in difficult circumstances internationally 
  • Be able to critically analyse and evaluate the implications of key international issues for schools, curriculum and classrooms and the relationships between the different levels

Assessment

Level H: One 3000 word assignment, topic to be decided in discussion with tutors

Level M: One 4000 word assignment, topic to be decided in discussion with tutors

 

Education Observation, Evaluation and Supervision

The module in Education Observation, Evaluation and Supervision develops comparative insights into the educational system in England through a series of visits to schools and colleges (including visits specifically arranged for TEFL students) linked to related seminars and, in particular, how teaching and managing can be assessed, inspected and improved. This module is compulsory for MA students. (Term 1).  

Aims

Level H students 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the English education system; 
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of approaches to comparing educational systems; 
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of effective teaching and of approaches to the observation and evaluation of teaching and learning; 
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of school development planning and approaches to school improvement.

Additional learning outcomes for level M students

  • Compare and critically analyse policy in the English education system and that in your own country; 
  • Compare and critically analyse practice in the English education system and that in your own country; 
  • Compare and critically analyse the school inspection system in England and that in your own country; 
  • Critically analyse research evidence on the characteristics of effectiveness in schools and its relevance to your own country.

Assessment

The assignment for Level H Adcert and BPhil is 3000 words maximum and for Level M PGCert and MEd 4000 words maximum.

Practitioner Inquiry in Education

‘PIE’ is a research methods module which prepares students to undertake a project leading to a dissertation. It includes both lectures and small-group seminars. This module is compulsory for all MA and MEd students (Term 1)  

Aims

The PIE module aims to help you develop knowledge and skills in research methods to enable you to plan, design and carry out your research project and prepare you for your dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this module it is expected that you will be able to demonstrate understanding of the processes involved in designing, planning and carrying out a small-scale research project by writing a 4000 word proposal of your research project for your dissertation in which you will be able to:

  • clearly describe the topic and purpose of your research; 
  • formulate a research question(s) that can be answered through small-scale research; 
  • identify relevant research and/or theoretical literature to review; 
  • construct a research design that will enable you to answer your research questions; 
  • justify your selection of research approach and methods of data collection and analysis with reference to research methods literature; 
  • anticipate practical and ethical issues that might be encountered in your research project, explaining how these might be addressed.

     

International Study Skills and Communication

This module is open to all students. The sessions provide support for studying at Birmingham, but also generate ideas for teaching study and communications skills in your home country. Topics include: critical thinking, essay writing, plain English, presentations, and dissertation planning. (Term 1) This is not a formally accredited module. There is no coursework or assignments. 

Human Rights, Citizenship and the Environment

This module examines ideas and case studies about global justice and education, through human rights, citizenship and environment. 

  • How can we develop ‘global citizens’, who will also be able to survive democratically in a very uncertain globalising world? 
  • How can human rights be used as a basis for developing education and policy in schools? 
  • How can positive human survival be helped through educating about the environment?

The teaching of these issues can be highly controversial and may require particular sorts of teaching approaches and different assessment criteria in schools. Young people participate in researching the world, and contributing to achieving change.

Aims

At the end of the module, Level H students will: 

  • be able to define citizen, citizenship and civil society
  • be aware of the varied definitions of democracy 
  • have a working knowledge of various human rights conventions, and other international instruments related to education 
  • be able to assess the implications of these conventions for schools
  • be aware of different models for environmental education 
  • know of the possibilities for pupil participation in school, national and global democracy 
  • be able to design appropriate teaching, evaluation and assessment models for human rights, citizenship and environmental education

At the end of the module, Level M students will also: 

  • be able to understand and critically discuss the different ideologies concerning ‘the citizen’, the ‘global citizen’ and ‘citizenship education’ 
  • have a philosophical understanding of the basis to human rights, of the possibility of conflicts of rights, and of the bases whereby such conflicts can be resolved 
  • be able to distinguish different models of democracy, particularly as they refer to different cultures, contexts and philosophies.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on an assignment about a ‘global justice issue’ that may be significant in a particular country during the next 20 years, discussing the educational implications and existing strategies in relation to that issue, and planning an education project to address it.

Leadership for School Improvement

This module focuses on the qualities and skills that will enable education professionals to play a more effective part – as members of management teams – in the leadership of their school or area of responsibility, and also examines the needs, demands and aspirations of the various stakeholders in schools; the culture in schools; the vision for the future development of schools; and planning and managing change. (Term 2)

Personal and Professional Skills for Education Managers

The module in Personal and Professional Skills for Education Management encourages the development of skills which all education professionals need, including time and stress management, assertiveness, and managing relationships with colleagues. These are explored through personal reflection, and critiqued from comparative and gender perspectives. (Term 2)

Curriculum Design in Global Contexts

This module considers curriculum in an international context. It provides an understanding of the relationship between curriculum, power and politics from the level of a project or school to ministries and international agencies. It then covers practical aspects of curriculum design, a range of educational settings from universities to commercial training and street work. Diverse innovative ways to produce and deliver curriculum are considered - including the arts, ICT and public media - and the emphasis is on flexible, fast modes of curriculum development in response to changing circumstances in a globalising world.

The assignment is to plan a curriculum in relation to an international topic and setting of your choice, and hopefully this can be the basis for practical implementation after the course.

Aims

At the end of the module, Level M students will: 

  • become critically aware of the global and international factors affecting curriculum
  • critically understand differing approaches to curriculum design, planning, presentation and implementation
  • be aware of and able to analyse and address practical, political and cultural challenges when implementing curricula 
  • be familiar with diverse school-based, national and international case studies of curriculum design 
  • be able to design a basic curriculum and materials, in relation to their own personal interests and national context, and present it at a professional level

And Level H students will: 

  • become aware of the global factors affecting curriculum
  • understand differing approaches to curriculum design, presentation and implementation 
  • be aware of practical challenges when implementing curricula 
  • be familiar with diverse school-based and national case studies of curriculum design
  • be able to design a basic curriculum and materials in relation to their own personal interests and national context, and present it clearly

Assessment

Students will be assessed on their design of a new curriculum on any international topic. The first part of the assignment an academic essay, the second part is a set of instructions about the new curriculum, which an education specialist could use immediately. (Like a recipe or car repair manual!)

Fees and funding

Fees Home/EU 2014-2015

  • Codes 7402, 7403, 7405, 7406 AdCert full time £2,018
  • Codes 7440, 7441, 7442, 7445 AdCert part time £2,018
  • Codes 7277, 7286, 7289, 7291 BPhil full time £4,036
  • Codes 7408, 7409, 7410, 7416 BPhil part time £2,018 each year
  • Codes 7261, 7270, 7271, 7273 PGCert full time £1,980
  • Codes 7446, 7448, 7450, 7451 PGCert part time £1,980
  • Codes 7327, 7292, 7298, 7299 PGDip full time £3,960
  • Codes 7453, 7454, 7455, 7456 PGDip part time £1,980 each year
  • Codes 7330, 7331, 7332, 7334, 9142 MEd full time £5,940
  • Codes 7464, 7465, 7466, 7522, 9143 MEd part time £1,980 each year
  • Codes 7335, 7336, 7348, 7400, 9140 MA full time £5,940
  • Codes 7458, 7460, 7462, 7463, 9141 MA part time £1,980 each year

Fees are based on students studying 60 credits per year on part-time programmes.

The fees shown above are annual fees for students starting their courses September in 2014. Please note that where courses last more than one year, the annual fees for subsequent years on the course may increase due to inflation.

Fees Overseas 2014-2015

  • Codes 7402, 7403, 7405, 7406 AdCert full time £6,282.50
  • Codes 7440, 7441, 7442, 7445 AdCert part time £6,282.50
  • Codes 7277, 7286, 7289, 7291 BPhil full time £12,565
  • Codes 7408, 7409, 7410, 7416 BPhil part time £3,142 each year
  • Codes 7261, 7270, 7271, 7273 PGCert full time £4,555
  • Codes 7446, 7448, 7450, 7451 PGCert part time £4,555
  • Codes 7327, 7292, 7298, 7299 PGDip full time £9,110
  • Codes 7453, 7454, 7455, 7456 PGDip part time £4,555 first year; £4,400 second year
  • Codes 7330, 7331, 7332, 7334, 9142 MEd full time £13,665
  • Codes 7464, 7465, 7466, 7522, 9143 MEd part time £4,555 first year; £4,400 second year; £4,250 third year
  • Codes 7335, 7336, 7348, 7400, 9140 MA full time £13,665
  • Code 7458, 7460, 7462, 7463, 9141 MA part time £4,555 first year; £4,400 second year; £4,250 third year

Fees are based on students studying 60 credits per year on part-time programmes. 

The fees shown above are annual fees for students starting their courses September in 2014. Please note that where courses last more than one year, the annual fees for subsequent years on the course may increase due to inflation.

Please view our Fees for International Students page for further details.

Learn more about fees and funding

Funding for part-time students

From September 2012, the UK Government will provide non-means tested loans to cover the full cost of part-time tuition for all eligible English resident or non UK EU undergraduates. Find out more about the funding for part-time students.

Scholarships and studentships
Scholarships may be available. International students can often gain funding through overseas research scholarships, Commonwealth scholarships or their home government. More details may be found on the international scholarships page

For further information contact the School directly or the Student Funding Office via online enquiries

The Florence Congleton Scholarship is to support an African woman studying in the School of Education. The scholarship pays fees for one year of full time study, which would lead to MA/MEd. A contribution towards accommodation is also included. A student wishing to continue to the PhD programme would have to find the remaining fees and costs themselves. Find out more about the Florence Congleton Scholarship Award. 

Please note that this scholarship isn't available every year.

Entry requirements

The MEd qualification is restricted to qualified and experienced teachers, but is otherwise the same as the MA.

Please refer directly to the School of Education entry requirements webpage for further details 
 
International students

We accept a range of qualifications, our country pages show you what qualifications we accept from your country.

English language requirements

You can satisfy our English language requirements in two ways:

How to apply

When clicking on the Apply Now button you will be directed to an application specifically designed for the programme you wish to apply for where you will create an account with the University application system and submit your application and supporting documents online. Further information regarding how to apply online can be found on the How to apply pages

Apply now

Contact

Dr Paul Lynch
Telephone 44 (0)121 414 6735 
Email   p.lynch@bham.ac.uk   

Programme Administrator

Alison Duggan
Telephone +44(0)121 415 8274
Email  pgteducation-enquiries@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Learning and teaching

Masters students on International Studies in Education programmes each take six modules and do a dissertation. The core module, Education as an International Issue, is compulsory for all students, as is the research methods module, Practitioner Inquiry in Education (PIE) for MEd and MA students. For each particular pathway, students will have additional compulsory modules that help them to gain knowledge and skills relevant to their course. However, all students will have some choice in what they study, and will be able to tailor the topics of their assignments and dissertation to their own personal interests and professional aspirations.

Module sessions run in weekly three-hour blocks. In a typical three-hour session, there will be a mixture of tutor presentation, group discussions and exercises, and independent research. We aim for a stimulating variety, and to take advantage of the international nature of the group, we encourage student-to-student learning to develop a comparative and international perspective. There are also opportunities for one-to-one tutorials with lecturers.

Assessment for Masters modules is typically comprised of one 4000 word written assignment. For some modules, this will take the form of a traditional essay based mainly on an analysis of relevant literature. Innovative assessment approaches used in some modules include producing a written curriculum, reflections on school visits, or diaries. In the first term, there will be an early opportunity to submit a short piece of written work; the tutor will provide constructive feedback but a grade will not be assigned or counted. The dissertation for Masters students is 15,000 words in length, and usually includes some empirical research as well as literature review.

BPhil students (experienced teaches without a first degree) take four modules; assessment for each is 3000 words and the dissertation 10,000 words.

The specific information for each pathway is as follows:

International Studies in Education

Students on this pathway have free choice from among the International Studies in Education modules, and can tailor their choices to their own interests. The learning outcomes for each individual for the general ISE programme will depend on the combination of specific modules chosen.

International Studies in Education (Management and Policy)

The modules ‘Leadership for School Improvement’ and ‘Personal and Professional Skills for Education Managers’ are compulsory for this pathway. The topic of any dissertation must be relevant to management and policy in education.

Level H:
By the end of the programme, students will:

  • Have an understanding of key theories and issues in the management of education.
  • Have developed skills relevant to the management of education, and know how to apply these in their own places of work.

Level M:
By the end of the programme, students will:

  • Have a critical understanding of key theories and issues in the management of education.
  • Have developed skills relevant to the management of education, and know how to apply these judiciously in their own places of work.

International Studies in Education (Citizenship)

The module ‘Human Rights, Citizenship and the Environment’ is compulsory for this pathway. The topic of any dissertation must be relevant to education for citizenship.

Level H:
By the end of the programme, students will:

  • Have an understanding of definitions and major international issues in education for citizenship
  • Have reflected on the nature and relevance of education for citizenship in their own and other contexts 

Level M:
By the end of the programme, students will:

  • Have a critical and international perspective on definitions and issues in education for citizenship
  • Have reflected analytically and comparatively on the nature and relevance of education for citizenship in their own and other contexts 

International Studies in Education (Intercultural Communication)

The modules ‘Language, Discourse and Society’ (a module from the Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme ) and ‘Personal and Professional Skills for Education Managers’ are compulsory for this programme. The topic of any dissertation must be relevant to the theme of intercultural communication as it relates to education.

Level H:
By the end of the programme, students will: 

  • Have an understanding of key issues in the intercultural communication as they relate to education
  • Have developed skills in intercultural communication 

Level M:
By the end of the programme, students will:

  • Have a critical understanding of key issues in intercultural communication as they relate to education 
  • Have developed skills in intercultural communication and reflected analytically on their appropriate application.

International Studies in Education (Education and Development)

This programme combines modules from the International Development Department (IDD) with ISE modules (at least two from each, plus PIE and one other). Your compulsory IDD module is ‘Critical Approaches to Development’. The dissertation must be relevant to Education in Developing Countries, or to Development Education, and may be supervised either from the School of Education or the International Development Department. 

Level M:
By the end of the programme, students will: 

  • combine the study of education internationally with development studies
  • explore the interconnectedness of theories, issues and practices in education and development
  • carry out empirical research on a question that concerns both education and development
  • develop knowledge and skills that will help them to take up or build on careers in education (eg schools, colleges, higher education) and governmental, non-governmental and international organisations concerned with education in developing countries (eg aid agencies, charities, UNESCO)
     
      






     

Contact

Dr Paul Lynch
Telephone 44 (0)121 414 6735 
Email   p.lynch@bham.ac.uk   

Programme Administrator

Alison Duggan
Telephone +44(0)121 415 8274
Email  pgteducation-enquiries@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Employability

International Studies MA graduate, Zakiya Sapenova, appeared on Kazakhstan National TV in October. She made a keynote presentation about plagiarism and the Bologna Process, at a conference in Almaty. The Process harmonises Higher Education across Europe, and elsewhere, and the conference focused on Arts Universities.
Zakiya Sapenova
The employment prospects from the International Studies in Education programmes are as diverse as the students on the course. These courses are not qualifications for a particular role, but the knowledge and skills you gain will enable you to pursue a range of career paths in education. For example, graduates from this programme have gone on to work in the education sector in the following kinds of jobs in different countries:

  • education management at school level 
  • work in Ministries and other national and regional authorities 
  • work in non-governmental organisations promoting education 
  • work in UN agencies 
  • educational research 
  • publishing 
  • teaching in national or international schools 
  • jobs in further or higher education institutions 
  • establishing private schools 
  • education consultancy

International Studies in Education can help you to start your career; advance your career in new directions or to new levels; or it can simply help you to do and to appreciate your current job with an enlightened international perspective. Please note that like most Masters programmes, ISE does not confer qualified teacher status.

Contact

Dr Paul Lynch
Telephone 44 (0)121 414 6735 
Email   p.lynch@bham.ac.uk   

Programme Administrator

Alison Duggan
Telephone +44(0)121 415 8274
Email  pgteducation-enquiries@contacts.bham.ac.uk