Thermal energy storage

Thermal energy storage (TES) is a technology based on heating a storage medium so the thermal energy in the system can be used a later time. The time scale for a TES is of minutes for GWhs scale applications. TES can help to balance between the energy demand and supply on the grid, and utilize the waste heat generated by the different energy generation systems.

Around 90% of the global energy budget centres around conversion, storage, and transmission of thermal energy, fossil fuel-fired and nuclear power generation are thermally based and emits a huge amount of waste heat. The waste energy from these plants can be efficiently used by TES, increasing the efficiency of the plant and reducing CO2 emissions. The integration of TES with Coal-fired and nuclear power plants can increase substantially their peak shaving capabilities. Moreover, TES can play a pivotal role in large scale solar thermal power generation. CES-integration-with-nuclear-gen

Thermal energy storage (TES) is a technology based on heating a storage medium so the thermal energy in the system can be used a later time. The time scale for a TES is of minutes for GWhs scale applications. TES can help to balance between the energy demand and supply on the grid, and utilize the waste heat generated by the different energy generation systems.

Around 90% of the global energy budget centres around conversion, storage, and transmission of thermal energy, fossil fuel-fired and nuclear power generation are thermally based and emits a huge amount of waste heat. The waste energy from these plants can be efficiently used by TES, increasing the efficiency of the plant and reducing CO2 emissions. The integration of TES with Coal-fired and nuclear power plants can increase substantially their peak shaving capabilities. Moreover, TES can play a pivotal role in large scale solar thermal power generation.

Research projects

EPSRC (EP/J021199/1): £1.062M, Thermal energy storage (part of a £14.283M consortium led by Imperial College in collaboration with Cambridge, Oxford, St Andrews, Newcastle, UCL, Sheffield and Cardiff) on Capital for great technologies - Grid scale energy storage), October 2013 – 2015.

EPSRC (EP/K002252/1): £303.6k, Energy storage for a low carbon grid (part of a £5.59M consortium led by Imperial College in collaboration with Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Leeds, St Andrews, Sheffield and Cardiff), October 2012 – September 2017.

Details of the project can be found at: www.es-lcg.com

Facilities

TES facility TES facility TES facility
UMX2 Ultra-microbalance
Specification
  • Make: Mettler Toledo
  • Model: UMX2
  • Maximum Capacity: 2.1 g
  • Readability: 0.1 µg
Anton Paar Rheometer
Specification
  • Make: Anton Paar
  • Model: MCR 301
The Rheometer is used to measure the dynamic and shear viscosity of fluids. Additionally, the percentage decrease of the shear viscosity after test is determined.
MKS Cirrus 2 Mass Spectrometers
An atmospheric pressure gas monitoring system offers the versatility of Microvision 2 quadrupole mass spectrometry in a convenient bench-top configuration. It is used for on-line monitoring and analysis of gases and gas mixtures including trace contaminants in process gases, solvent vapors, hydrocarbons, atmospheric and inorganic gas species (including corrosives), freons, and noble gases.
Mettler Toledo DSC1
Specification
  • Make: Mettler Toledo
  • Temperature range: 150 -700 °C
  • Sampling rate: max. 50 Hz
Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is the most frequently used thermal analysis technique. DSC measures enthalpy changes in samples due to changes in their physical and chemical properties as a function of temperature or time
Dyno-mill bead mill
DYNO-MILL wet bead mill producing nanoparticles of Pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, foods. Algae CELL DISRUPTION - biodiesel biofuels.
Thermo-microbalance : TG 209 F1 Iris
The thermo-microbalance operates in a temperature range between 10°C (thermostat cooling) and 1000°C with freely selectable heating rates from 0.001 K/min up to 100 K/min. The exact sample temperature is detected by a thermocouple in direct contact with the crucible.
Malvern: Zetasizer Nano ZSP
The Zetasizer Nano ZSP is used for the measurement of size, electrophoretic mobility of proteins, zeta potential of nanoparticles and surfaces, and optionally the microrheology of protein and polymer solutions. The exceptional performance also enables the measurement of the molecular weight and second virial coefficient, A2, of macromolecules and kD, the DLS interaction parameter. The measure range is 0.3nm - 10.0 microns* (diameter).
Nikon TE2000-U Fluorescence Microscope
Nikon TE2000-U inverted microscope with diascopic illumination Pillar, T-FL EPI-fluorescence attachment, x-cite metal halide illumination system, and metamorph image acquisition and analysis software in an enhanced imaging Workstation.
KRUSS: TVA100 contact angle measuring device
The Top View Analyzer TVA100 measures the contact angle from the top using the distance between spots of light reflected from the curved drop surface. This allows nondestructive measurements on concave surfaces or surfaces in recesses in which a measurement of the shadow image with the illumination, sample and optics in a single plane is ruled out

People

Member

Role

Professor Yulong Ding
Chair in chemical Engineering

Dr Yongliang Li

Lecturer in School of Chemical Engineering


Dr Chuanping Liu
Visiting researcher from University of Science and Technology Beijing, China

Mr Chuan Li
PhD student in Birmingham Centre of Energy Storage

Publications

  1. Y.L. Ding, Handbook of Energy Storage Technologies, Editor-in-Chief, 600 pages, China Chemical Society Press, expected October 2014.
  2. Y.L. Ding, Solar electric energy storage overview, a chapter for Solar Energy Storage, Bent Sørensen eds , Elsevier BV, 2013.
  3. Z. Ge , F. Ye, H. Cao, G. Leng , Y. Qin and Y.L. Ding (2013) Carbonate salts based composite materials for medium and high temperature thermal energy storage, Particuology , In press.
  4. C. Wang, J Yang and Y. L. Ding (2013) Phase transfer based synthesis and thermophysical properties of Au/ Therminol VP-1 nanofluids , Progress in Natural Science: Materials International, In press.
  5. Y. Li, Y. Jin, Y. Huang, F. Ye, X. Wang, D. Li, C. Wang and Y.L. Ding (2013) Principles and new developments of thermal energy storage technology, Energy Storage Science & Technology, 2, 69-72.
  6. Y. Li, Y. Jin, Y. Huang, F. Ye, X. Wang, D. Li, C. Wang and Y.L. Ding (2013) Potential applications of thermal energy storage in electric power generation sector, 2, 165-171.
  7. S. Witharana, B. Phillips, S. Strobel , H. D. Kim, J.-B. Chang, J. Buongiorno , K. K. Berggren, L. Chen and Y.L. Ding (2012) Bubble Nucleation on Nano - to Micro-size Cavities and Posts: An Experimental Validation of Classical Theory, Journal of Applied Physics, 112, 064904.
  8. P.X. Song, D.S. Wen and Y.L. Ding (2012) Nano -fuels: a new energy storage carrier, Energy Storage Science & Technology, 1, 41-49.
  9. Z. Ge , F. Ye, M. Lasfargues, J. Yang and Y. Ding (2012) Recent progress and perspective of medium and high temperature thermal energy storage materials, Energy Storage Science & Technology, 2, 89-102.
  10. B. Ma, J. Li, Z. Peng and Y. Ding (2012) Paraffin based composite phase change materials for thermal energy storage: thermal conductivity enhancement, Energy Storage Science & Technology, 2, 131-138.
  11. Feng Ye, W. Hu, T. Zhang, J. Yang and Y.L. Ding (2012) Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of Pt-nanostructures prepared by electrodeposition using poly (vinyl pyrrolidone ) as a shape-control agent, Electrochimica Acta , 83, 383–386.
  12. P. Wang, Z. Peng, S. Wang, X. Wang and Y. Ding (2012) Numerical simulation of heat transfer behavior of a twisted pipe containing a phase change material, Energy Storage Science & Technology, 2, 116-122.
  13. Y.L. Ding, J. Yun, X.H. Li, Y. Tang, Y. Jiang (2012) Evaluation of nano -packing on the shelf life of fresh-cut lotus root ( NelumbonuciferaGaerth ), Advances in Technology and Management , 165, 775-780.
  14. I. Palabiyik , Z. Musina , S. Witharana, and Y. Ding (2011) Dispersion stability and thermal conductivity of propylene glycol-based nanofluids , Journal of Nanoparticle Research, 13, 5049–5055.
  15. H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding, N.T. Cong, B.L. Dou, V. Dupont , M. Ghadiri and P.T. Williams (2011) A comparative study on hydrogen production from steam-glycerol reforming: thermodynamics and experimental. Renewable Energy, 36, 779-788.
  16. Y. Wang, Y. Huang, E. Chiremba , A. P. Roskilly , N. Hewitt, Y.L. Ding, D. Wua , H Yu, X. Chen, Y. Li, , J. Huang, R. Wang and J. Wu, Z. Xia, C. Tan (2011) An investigation of a household size trigeneration running with hydrogen, Applied Energy, Accepted.
  17. C.Y. Yang and Y.L. Ding (2011) Multi-scale modelling of liquid suspensions of micron particles in the presence of nanoparticles, Advances in Transport Phenomena 2011, Accepted.
  18. G Okeke , S Witharana , SJ Antony and Y Ding (2012) Computational analysis of factors influencing thermal conductivity of nanofluids , Journal of Nanoparticle Research, 12, 6365-6375.
  19. D. Xu, C. Hodges, Y. Ding, S. Biggs, A. Brooker and D. York (2010) Adsorption kinetics of laponite and ludox silica nanoparticles onto a deposited poly( diallyldimethylammonium chloride) layer measured by a quartz crystal microbalance and optical reflectometry , Langmuir, 26, 18105-18112.
  20. C.S. Hodges, Y.L. Ding, S.R. Biggs (2010) The influence of nanoparticle shape on the drying of colloidal suspensions, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 352, 99-106.
  21. Yi Jin, W.P. Lee, Z. Musina and Y.L. Ding (2010) A one-step method for producing microencapsulated phase change materials, Particuology , 8, 588-590.
  22. H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding, Y.L. Li, X.J. Zhang and C.Q. Tan (2010) Air fuelled zero emission road transportation: A comparative study, Applied Energy, 88, 337 – 342.
  23. H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding, N.T. Cong, B.L. Dou, V. Dupont , M. Ghadiri and P.T. Williams (2010) Progress in low temperature hydrogen production with simultaneous CO2 abatement. Chemical Engineering Research and Design, In Press.
  24. D. Olusanami , Y. Ding, M. Ghadiri and K.J. Roberts (2010) Effect of temperature and humidity on the breakage behaviour of aspirin and sucrose, Powder Technology, 201, 248-252.
  25. Y.D. Wang, Y. Huang, A.P. Roskilly , Y.L. Ding and N. Hewitt (2010) Trigeneration running with raw jatropha oil, Fuel Processing Technology, in Press.
  26. B. Dou, Rickett , V. Dupont , P.T. Williams, H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding and M. Ghadiri (2010) Steam reforming of crude glycerol with in-situ CO2 sorption, Bioresource Technology, 101, 2436-2442.
  27. Y.L. Ding, H.S. Chen, Z. Musina , Y. Jin, T.F. Zhang, S. Witharana and W. Yang (2010) Relationship between thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of nanofluids , Physica Scripta T, in Press.
  28. L. Wang, G. Lin, H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding, (2009), Convective heat transfer of Nano -enabled phase change material, Science in China - E Series, 52, 1744-1750
  29. Y.R. He, Y. Men, X. Liu, H. Lu, H.S. Chen, Y.L. Ding (2009) Study on Forced Convective Heat Transfer of Non-Newtonian Nanofluids , Journal of Thermal Science, 18(1), 20-26.