Languages of memory

Date(s)
Wednesday 27th June 2012 (09:00-16:30)
Contact

Workshop Leaders: Dr Joanne Sayner and Dr Paul Miller

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Description
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The workshop sought to explore the different languages that are used to research memory in different disciplines. It provided space for knowledge exchange across the University and for the methodological launch of our research group.

By ‘languages’ we mean something very broadly conceived, which refers to all the different theoretical, methodological and thematic ways we approach memory. During the workshop we engaged in a conversation with those in different disciplines within the University to discover the points of contact and shared interests. Our focus was on the languages, traditions and contexts that might enable or hinder future collaboration.

The Memory Group was set up four years ago in the College of Arts and Law and via the workshop we wanted to strengthen links with colleagues in the College of Social Sciences and the College of Life and Environmental Sciences. Members of the group shared information about successes in research funding (including from the AHRC, DAAD, Leverhulme, Marie Curie, MRC, BBSRC, IRCHSS) and publications (including a publication series related to memory studies), and disseminated information about external academic and non-academic networks within Europe and beyond.

In preparation for the workshop all participants read two articles (by Jeffrey Olick and by Hans J. Markowitsch) which took as their focus the different disciplinary approaches to memory. The participants were also asked to consider what questions they would most like to ask of colleagues within arts/social sciences/sciences respectively and to highlight their key areas of interest.

The workshop began with a ninety minute plenary discussion on the topic: 'What do we mean when we talk about memory?'. It was followed by presentations from postgraduate researchers on their doctoral projects. The subsequent discussions focussed on the challenges for those involved in interdisciplinary memory studies. The afternoon sessions involved smaller group discussions on themes and keywords suggested by the participants at the end of the morning session. The workshop concluded with plans for further collaboration, the result of which has been the instigation of a network on 'Social Memory Studies: Consolidation, Reception and Translation'.

Attendees:

  • Ivor Bolton (PhD student, Dept of Political Science and International Studies)
  • Dr Béatrice Damamme-Gilbert (French Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Richard Clay (Heritage Hub, History of Art)
  • Prof. Bill Dodd (German Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Xavier Duffy (PhD student, Institute for Archaeology and Antiquity)
  • Elly Harrowell (PhD student, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences)
  • Dr Kate Ince (French Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Sara Jones (Birmingham Fellow, Dept of Political Science and International Studies)
  • Dr Angela Kershaw (French Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Joff Lee (Psychology)
  • Emma Login (PhD student, IAA)
  • Claire MacLeod Peters (PhD student, French Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Peter McMenamin (PhD student, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences)
  • Dr Paul Miller (Marie Curie Fellow, History and Cultures)
  • Dr Jeremy Morris (Russian Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Lorraine Ryan (Birmingham Fellow, Hispanic Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Antonio Sanchez (Hispanic Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Joanne Sayner (German Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Berny Sèbe (French Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Ruth Whittle (German Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Isabel Wollaston (Philosophy, Theology and Religion).
  • Other members of the Memory Group include:
  • Samina Amin (MPhil student, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Martin Bommas (Institute for Archaeology and Antiquity)
  • Dr Lisa Bortolotti (Philosophy, Theology and Religion)
  • Dr Henry Chapman (Heritage Hub, IAA)
  • John Francis (MPhil student, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Jonathan Grix (Political Science and International Studies)
  • Dr Monica Jato (Hispanic Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Prof John Klapper (German Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Prof Frank Lough (Hispanic Studies, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Dr Dominique Moran (Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences)
  • Holly Pike (PhD student, Dept of Modern Languages)
  • Professor Matthew Rampley (History of Art)