Dr Katherine Doolin

Lecturer

Birmingham Law School

Contact details

Telephone +44 (0)121 414 6298

Fax +44 (0)121 414 3585

Email k.doolin@bham.ac.uk

Birmingham Law School
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom

About

Dr Katherine Doolin researches and teaches in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and criminology. She has particular expertise in the theory and practice of restorative justice in a criminal justice context. She has published in this area and has given papers at international conferences and seminars, most recently in Leuven (with British Academy funding), Bilbao (with Society of Legal Scholars funding), Birmingham and Kent. She has considerable experience of restorative justice projects having previously worked as a researcher on Home Office and Youth Justice Board funded evaluations. She is the co-author of An Exploratory Evaluation of Restorative Justice Schemes, Crime Reduction Series 9 (Home Office, 2001) (with Miers, Maguire et al). She is contributing editor of Whose Criminal Justice? State or Community? (Waterside Press, 2011) (with Child, Raine and Beech). She has been a Visiting Scholar at the Leuven Institute of Criminology, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, funded by the British Academy. Dr Doolin is the College of Arts and Law Director of Student Development and Support. She was awarded Birmingham Law School’s Teaching Excellence Award for 2006-2007.

Feedback and office hours

 MY FEEDBACK AND OFFICE HOURS FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE SUMMER TERM ARE:

Tuesday 10 June 12-2

Thursday 19 June 2-3, 4-5.

 If you wish to see me outside of those times, please email me at K.Doolin@bham.ac.uk to arrange an appointment.

Qualifications

  • LLB (Hons) (Waikato)
  • PhD (Kent)
  • Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand

Biography

Dr Doolin graduated with a LLB (first class honours) from the University of Waikato, New Zealand, before qualifying as a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand. She has a PhD in Law from the University of Kent. She is currently a lecturer in law at the University of Birmingham, having previously taught at the law schools at the University of Kent and University of Waikato, New Zealand. Prior to taking up the lectureship at Birmingham Law School, Dr Doolin worked as a researcher on Home Office and Youth Justice Board funded evaluations of restorative justice schemes in England and Wales. She has been a Visiting Scholar at the Leuven Institute of Criminology at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, having been awarded funding by the British Academy to research the use of restorative justice in Belgium.

Teaching

  • Criminal Law (LLB, GDL)
  • Restorative Justice (module leader, LLM)
  • Criminology (LLB)

Postgraduate supervision

  • Restorative Justice
  • Criminal Justice
  • Criminal Law

Current doctoral supervision

Dr Doolin is currently supervising three doctoral students undertaking research in the following areas:

  • Restorative justice and the public interest
  • Colonial policing in Malta
  • An empirical study of the attitudes and experiences of juvenile offenders in an English Young Offender Institution

Research

Dr Doolin’s main areas of research are criminal law, criminal justice and criminology. She has particular expertise in the theory and practice of restorative justice as a response to offending. She has published in this area on a number of issues including definitional aspects of restorative justice, restorative justice for young offenders in England and Wales, family group conferences in New Zealand, and the concept of ‘community’ within restorative justice. She has given papers on restorative justice at international conferences and seminars, most recently in Leuven (with British Academy funding), Bilbao (with Society of Legal Scholars funding), Birmingham and Kent. She has considerable experience of restorative justice projects having worked as a researcher on Home Office and Youth Justice Board funded evaluations prior to taking up the lectureship at the University of Birmingham. She is the co-author of An Exploratory Evaluation of Restorative Justice Schemes, Crime Reduction Series 9 (Home Office, 2001) (with Miers, Maguire et al), which has been widely cited in literature on restorative justice.

During August-September 2008 and February 2009, Dr Doolin was a Visiting Scholar at the Leuven Institute of Criminology, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, funded by a British Academy grant. The Institute is a leading research institute in the field of restorative justice and houses the secretariat of the European Forum for Restorative Justice, of which Dr Doolin is a member. The purpose of the research was to compare and contrast the use of restorative responses to juvenile offending in Belgium with those used in New Zealand, and England and Wales. This is part of an ongoing larger project which compares the application of restorative values in selected civil and common law jurisdictions. She is currently engaged in research that examines the Coalition Government’s proposals for restorative justice in England and Wales, in particular Neighbourhood Resolution Panels and responses to youth offending.  

Dr Doolin is a member of the Birmingham Community and Criminal Justice Group at the University of Birmingham. She is contributing editor (with Child, Raine and Beech) of their inaugural publication Whose Criminal Justice? State or Community? (Waterside Press, 2011). Drawing on the different disciplines of law, criminology, forensic psychology, social work and public management, the collection of papers explores the shifts and progress made in criminal justice in England and Wales over the past two decades and highlights the possibilities and pitfalls under the current Coalition Government.

Other activities

Dr Doolin is the College of Arts and Law (CAL) Director of Student Development and Support. She serves on the CAL Student Experience Group, which she chaired until January 2012, and the CAL Education Committee.  

She was the Law School’s Head of Student Development and Support and Staff Liaison Contact from 2009-2011. She also served on the Law School’s Learning and Teaching Committee and Staff Student Committee, which she chaired.

Dr Doolin is a member of the Law School’s Institute of Judicial Administration and served as its Director (2009-2010) and Deputy Director (2008-2009). In May 2011, she organised (with Birmingham and Sutton Coldfield Magistrates Association) a lecture to commemorate the establishment of the Magistracy in England and Wales. The lecture, which took place at the University of Birmingham, was well attended with magistrates, staff and students joining dignitaries such as Mr John Thornhill JP, Chairman of the Magistrates Association of England and Wales, and Dr Robert Hawker JP, Chairman of the Bench.

She is a qualified, non-practising barrister and solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand. She is a member of the European Forum for Restorative Justice and the Birmingham Community and Criminal Justice Group.

Publications

Books

  • Whose Criminal Justice? State or Community? (Hook: Waterside Press, 2011) 285 pp. ISBN 9781904380627(pb) ISBN 9781906534905 (E-book) (edited with J. Child, J. Raine and A. Beech).
  • Criminal Justice (London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2nd ed, 2002) 474 pp. ISBN 0421738405 (with S. Uglow and L. Dickson and D. Cheney).

Articles and Chapters in Books

  • ‘Looking to the future – shifting the balance in criminal justice’ in K. Doolin, J. Child, J. Raine and A. Beech (eds), Whose Criminal Justice? State or Community? (Hook: Waterside Press, 2011) 243-253 (with A. Beech, J. Child and J. Raine).
  • ‘Empowering Communities through Restorative Justice’ in K. Doolin, J. Child, J. Raine and A. Beech (eds), Whose Criminal Justice? State or Community? (Hook: Waterside Press, 2011) 143-157.
  •  ‘Translating Restorative Justice into Practice: Lessons from New Zealand’s Family Group Conferencing Approach to Youth Offending’ (2008) 4(1) International Journal of Restorative Justice 1-24.
  • ‘But What Does It Mean? Seeking Definitional Clarity in Restorative Justice’ (2007) 71(5) Journal of Criminal Law 427-440.
  •  ‘Youth Justice’ in S. Uglow with L. Dickson, D. Cheney and K. Doolin, Criminal Justice (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2nd ed, 2002) 425-446.
  • ‘HM Prison Service Annual Report’ in M. Leech and D. Cheney (eds), The Prisons Handbook 2002 (Hook: Waterside Press, 6th ed, 2002) 588.
  • ‘Prisons Ombudsman Annual Report’ in M. Leech and D. Cheney (eds), The Prisons Handbook 2002 (Hook: Waterside Press, 6th ed, 2002) 589.

Published Reports

Reviews

  • Marian Liebmann, Restorative Justice: How It Works (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2007) Reviewed for (2008) 57 Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law 171-174.
  • Sharon Lamb, The Trouble with Blame: Victims, Perpetrators, and Responsibility (London: Harvard University Press, 1999) Reviewed for (2001) 9(2) Feminist Legal Studies 195-197.

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