Research activity

Here is a list of all the research activity pages:

Generic List

Micro-engineering research: Mechanical energy scavenging for in-wheel sensors

Description
The aim of this EPSRC first Grant project is to develop a novel energy harvesting system to power in-wheel sensors. The harvesting system is based around clockwork and uses a spring rather than a battery to smooth out and store the available energy. The project assesses the capability of commercially available energy harvesting watch technology to develop the clockwork harvester system. The project also gathers real data on the vibration and rotation seen in typical car journeys to assess the viability of this new energy harvester and other vibrational harvesting systems.

Microenvironmental Regulation of Antibody Responses

Description
Information page for the Microenvironmental Regulation of Antibody Responses research group, led by Adam Cunningham, Ian MacLennan, Antal Rot, and Kai Toellner, at the University of Birmingham.

Micromanipulation and Microencapsulation research

Description
Over the last 20 years, novel micromanipulation techniques have been developed by the Group of Micromanipulation, School of Chemical Engineering, initially led by Prof. Colin Thomas and now by Prof. Zhibing Zhang, to measure the mechanical properties of single microparticles, including animal cells, yeast, bacteria, pollen grains, microspheres and microcapsules.

Microstructure Engineering Research Group

Description
To showcase the Microstructure Research group and provide links to it's people, projects and activities

Midlands Integrative Biosciences Training Partnership

Description
Midlands Integrative Biosciences Training Partnership

MifeMiso trial

Description
MifeMiso - A randomised placebo-controlled trial of mifepristone and misoprostol versus misoprostol alone in the medical management of missed miscarriage

MITCON

Description
MitCon: Automated Conflict Resolution in Clinical Pathways

Modelling for Health Economics

Description
This research group is formed around one of the two methodological programmes within the Health Economics Unit. The research programme arises from concerns about the modelling methods sometimes applied within health economics and a recognition of the importance of observing and developing good practice. The overall aim of the programme is to improve the performance and presentation of the results of model-based analysis for decision making, by continued development and dissemination of aspects of good practice. The programme has two main research areas: 1. Issues to do with uncertainty, including: a) Uncertainty in model construction; b) Representing uncertainty in model results 2. Technical methods of modelling to improve accuracy and/or efficiency of model running, including: a) Methods from numerical analysis; b) Methods for dealing with large decision spaces
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