New article in JTS by Dr Chris Jordan

Posted on Friday 20th September 2013

Dr Chris Jordan, who gained his PhD at ITSEE in 2010, has published a new article in the Journal of Theological Studies.

chris-jordan

Entitled "The Rediscovery of the Sherborne Lectionary", it tells of the recent identification of two parchment leaves at Sherborne School from a Greek New Testament Manuscript. There is online access to the article at the JTS Advance Access website. The abstract is as follows:

"Greek lectionaries are codices with Gospel and/or Apostolos readings that were designed to be recited during the liturgical services of the Byzantine Church, especially the Divine Liturgy. This article is about two sheets (4 folia) of parchment from a Greek lectionary recently rediscovered in the archives of Sherborne School, Dorset. The first half of the article introduces the known history of the leaves and contains some palaeographical observations such as material, layout, script, date, and presence of correctors. Using Colwell’s study of the frequency of intruding majuscule letters as a means of dating the minuscule script, I propose that the manuscript should have an earlier date than previously thought. The lectionary content is discussed in particular the Apostolos and Gospel readings that are found between the Ninth Hour and Vespers pericopes of Holy Friday. I suggest that the single Apostolos pericope derives from the lectionary system of the Jerusalem Church and discuss how this pericope together with the succeeding Gospel one makes this collection of readings rare within the Byzantine lectionary tradition. In the form of a transcription I present the textual content of the leaves following the transcription rules of the International Greek New Testament Project. The article ends with a list of readings that differ from the Majority Text, one of which matches a singular reading of the fifth-century Codex Cantabrigiensis (05)."

Dr Jordan's PhD on Greek Gospel Lectionaries, currently in preparation for publication, can be downloaded from the University of Birmingham Institutional Repository.