Justice for all - unless you are poor


 
andrew-sanders-perspective

Professor Andrew Sanders

“The lawyer-client relationship will be destroyed as clients will not be able to change their lawyer if they are not satisfied with their work.”

Read full opinion

Have your say

Feedback
  • David  McNeil
    External
    1. At 10:14PM on 05 June 2013, David McNeil wrote

    The real injustice has been that the majority of people in work who would not have qualified to receive legal aid, but paid taxes to the treasury which ultimately wound up funding it, have been denied access to justice due to the crippling costs. Having personally been in a position where I was unable to challenge a quite ridiculous Land Registry decision a few years ago for precisely this reason, I can wholeheartedly attest to this. While "two wrongs" don't make a right, levelling the field in this way least goes some way to correcting this imbalance , and perhaps more importantly, gives more people an incentive to desire to see simplification about our often unjustifiably complex (and expensive) legal system where the only beneficiaries at times seem to be the legal profession.

  • Teneil Brown
    External
    2. At 7:51AM on 10 June 2013, Teneil Brown wrote

    I am not a national of Britain and am therefore not au fait with what maintains in the British judiciary system. Nonetheless, I found this particular situation as chronicled and argued by Professor Sanders insightful yet disturbing. I do hope in dissecting the matter, that as he says in the last paragraph, people will object to these policies and hold Government accountable to the least among the populace so that there can be 'justice for all' as justice was intended to be executed.

  • jian zhou
    External
    3. At 11:11AM on 10 June 2013, wrote

    Please receive it. The real injustice has been that the majority of people in work who would not have qualified to receive legal aid, but paid taxes to the treasury which ultimately wound up funding it, have been denied access to justice due to the crippling costs. thanks.for you

  • Ng Shu Qin
    External
    4. At 10:34AM on 13 June 2013, Ng Shu Qin wrote

    I believe what Prof Sanders is discussing in his paper is very true indeed. In fact this is not just happening to the legal sector, but to other public sectors such as health care too. The rich are getting richer, because they are self sustainable, their children receive better education i.e private schools, which ensure that they will head somewhere in life at a later stage anyways. However, much of the poor are getting poorer since their children receive very poor education and much of the policies are not in their favor. As much as I want to agree with a below comment on how people are denied justice due to its crippling cost, dont you think that by reducing the money channeled towards this, it will only make the issue worst off for people who can't really afford private legal services in the first place?