The Birmingham Brief

The Birmingham Brief - intelligent thought on policy issues.

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Thursday 5th January 2012

The Politics of Sporting Mega Events: do the benefits justify the budgets?

The Politics of Sporting Mega Events: do the benefits justify the budgets?
Description
The London Olympics will undoubtedly be a spectacular success and bring with it a number of memorable sporting moments. Beyond the two weeks of action, however, it is worth reflecting on the increasingly political use of sport by a wide variety of states throughout the world. In recent years, there has been a shift from advanced capitalist states to developing, small or 'emerging' states who have queued up to stage a sporting mega-event.
Date:
Thursday 5th January 2012
Categories:
Social Sciences
Thursday 3rd November 2011

Building a Transparent System of Global Aid

Description
Having transparent mechanisms for distribution of global aid is hugely important. It allows scrutiny to ensure money is used effectively. The global aid landscape has changed drastically with the rise of southern donors like India and China. This makes it even more important that transparency for public flows of development aid should be non-negotiable, irrespective of whether or not they are official development assistance.
Date:
Thursday 3rd November 2011
Categories:
International, Social Sciences
Tuesday 1st November 2011

Why 'Faith in the City'?

Description
This week as part of the ESRC's Festival of Social Science 2011, I will be hosting the event, "Faith in the City: communities, regeneration, interaction". The event sets out to explore the way in which faith inspires and influences people to live, work and act in the diverse, vibrant urban space that is today's Birmingham. Despite Alastair Campbell stating the British "don't do God", the event is interesting to many.
Date:
Tuesday 1st November 2011
Categories:
Social Sciences

What has the EU ever done for us...?

Description
Counterfactual analysis, the art of assessing how the world might look if something had not happened, is notoriously difficult and highly sensitive to the assumptions one makes about the alternative scenarios. Forecasting the impact of a major policy reversal is fraught with similar difficulties.
Date:
Tuesday 1st November 2011
Categories:
Social Sciences
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