The Birmingham Brief

Intelligent thought on policy issues.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Birmingham.

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Thursday 25th May 2017

City-regions need great universities as strong and committed 'anchor institutions'

Description
As we come to terms with this week's terrorist attack, our thoughts are with the families of those affected by this senseless act; not just in Manchester, but across the North-West. Like many regions across the country, the North-West is dependent upon the skills and talents of its young people, particularly those coming out of universities, to contribute to the region's success.
Date:
Thursday 25th May 2017
Thursday 18th May 2017

Unprecedented: how the WannaCry cyber-attack brought thousands to a standstill

Description
Written by Conor McKenna, Doctoral Researcher in Cyberwarfare. WannaCry is ransomware on a level that has never been seen before. Predictions of its arrival have been long standing, but the rapid spread of infections caused frustration, anger and fear among the general public when it hit our computers last week. While in the UK the NHS was one of the organisations worst hit by the malware; over 200,000 victims have been logged across the globe.
Date:
Thursday 18th May 2017
Thursday 11th May 2017

Why the West Midlands is an electoral barometer for the country as a whole

Description
Written by Professor David Cutts, Professor of Political Science. Theresa May's visit to Wolverhampton last Saturday spoke volumes about the Conservatives emerging electoral strategy. Following their high-profile Mayoral win in the West Midlands and a strong local election performance across the rest of the country, the question is increasingly not whether May remains Prime Minister, but just how big a majority over Labour the Conservatives will get.
Date:
Thursday 11th May 2017
Thursday 27th April 2017

The quality of work and well-being: are we doing enough?

Description
In recent years, concerns over the quality of work have prompted debates surrounding methods of improving job quality, and the relationship between the quality of work and employee well-being. Existing research has attempted to identify the constituents of job quality and 'good work'. Factors argued as affecting the relative quality of jobs include pay (including relative income levels), skill, levels of autonomy, variety, work intensity, the length of the working day/week, job security, opportunities for training and development, and availability of flexible working arrangements.
Date:
Thursday 27th April 2017
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