Global Human Resource Management: Bridging Strategic and Institutional Perspectives

Locations
G12 Main Lecture Theatre University House Birmingham Business School
Category
Alumni, Research, Social Sciences, Students, Teaching
Date(s)
Wednesday 18th April 2012 (16:00-17:30)
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Description

The Department of Management is delighted to invite you to a lecture by visiting scholar, Professor Rosemary Batt. Professor Batt is a leading scholar of business and the global economy.

Please confirm your attendance to Michele Donovan:  m.l.donovan@bham.ac.uk  or 0121-414-3221 by Monday 2 April. 

Global Human Resource Management: Bridging Strategic and Institutional Perspectives

The purpose of this paper is to bridge the boundaries separating strategic and comparative institutional perspectives on human resource systems and employment relations.  Each research tradition has investigated the role and outcomes of corporations as they operate in an increasingly global economy.  Researchers in these traditions, however, have adopted quite different approaches in terms of their disciplinary heritage, theoretical assumptions and methodologies, and central research questions.  While they have pursued parallel but separate tracks, we argue that they have important lessons for each other.  In this paper, we review the core characteristics of each research tradition, provide a series of examples of efforts to bridge these different traditions, and offer suggestions for future integration.

Rosemary Batt is the Alice Hanson Cook Professor of Women and Work at the ILR School, Cornell University. She is a Professor in Human Resource Studies and International and Comparative Labor. She received her BA from Cornell University and her Ph.D. from the Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on comparative international studies of management and employment relations, with particular attention to the globalization and restructuring of service industries, and its impact on low wage workers. She is co-coordinator of the Global Call Center Research Project (www.globalcallcenter.org). She has written extensively on human resource practices and their effect on firm performance, the quality of jobs, and wage and employment outcomes.

Her work has appeared in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, British Journal of Industrial Relations, the European Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial Relations, International Journal of Human Resource Management, and Personnel Psychology. She is co-editor of the Oxford Handbook on Work and Organization and co-author of The New American Workplace: Transforming Work Systems in the United States, Cornell University Press.