Professor Miles Tight BSc, PGCE, PhD, FRSA

Professor of Transport, Energy and Environment
Tutor for Postgraduate research programme

School of Civil Engineering

Professor Miles Tight

Contact details

Civil Engineering
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Miles Tight is Professor of Transport, Energy and Environment. He was previously a senior lecturer in transport planning at the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds. He has been actively researching safety, equity and sustainability of travel for over 20 years with a particular emphasis recently on sustainability of transport. Most recently his research interests focus on walking and cycling, the nature of long term and large scale change in transport systems and the future design and form of sustainable urban areas. He has been involved in a wide range of research projects funded by UK research councils, the European Union and others in these areas and is currently leading the 5 year EPSRC STEP-CHANGE (Sustainable Transport Evidence and modelling Paradigms: Cohort Household Analysis to support New Goals in Engineering design) project (www.changing-mobilities.org.uk). 

He teaches on a variety of modules at both undergraduate and postgraduate level in the areas of transport and sustainability. 

Qualifications

  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, November 2008 
  • Ph.D. Transport, University of London (University College), 1987 
  • Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE), University of London (Goldsmiths' College), 1982 
  • B.Sc. (Honours) Geography, University of Liverpool, 1981

Biography

Professor Tight graduated from the University of Liverpool with an Honours degree in Geography in 1981. He then moved to Goldsmiths’ College in the University of London to do a Postgraduate Certificate of Education, completing this in 1982. His doctorate studies were at University College London in the Transport Studies Group (now Centre for Transport Studies) where his thesis was on the accident involvement and exposure to risk of children as pedestrians on urban roads. His PhD was awarded in 1987. After completing his studies Professor Tight moved to the Institute for Transport Studies at Leeds University, firstly as a Research Fellow, then as Lecturer and Senior Lecturer. He moved to the University of Birmingham in April 2012 as Professor of Transport, Energy and Environment.

Teaching

Professor Tight currently teaches on the following modules: 

  • Sustainable Transport Policy 
  • Road Safety 
  • Construction Design and Transport Infrastructure 
  • Guided research 
  • Guided study 
  • Civil Engineering research project 
  • Resilience projects

Postgraduate supervision

No Birmingham Research Students at present. 

Professor Tight still retains an involvement in supervision of 3 Leeds University PhD students: 

  • Noor Zaitun Yahaya: The development of an ultra-fine model of particles emitted from motor vehicles in a restricted urban area 
  • Helen Muir: Pedestrian casualties and deprivation: the contribution of exposure, behaviour and attitude 
  • Ian Phillips: The potential role of walking and cycling to increase resilience of transport systems to future external shocks

Research

Key current and recent research projects include:

STEP-CHANGE (Sustainable Transport Evidence and modelling Paradigms: Cohort Household Analysis to support New Goals in Engineering design). (Principal Investigator). Funded through the EPSRC Sustainable Urban Environment programme. Project value just over £1.5 million. Jointly with the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds, the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) at the University of Manchester and the School of Sociology at the University of York. January 2011 – December 2015.

There is an accepted need to promote step changes towards more sustainable urban environments, notably in transport and travel, which we will focus on. While many model-based desk-studies have aimed to simulate such environments as part of a decision support tool, they adopt many unvalidated, hypothetical assumptions, particularly in the way that major transport focused interventions might impact on both behaviour and the effectiveness of the infrastructure. There is very little real evidence of what works and what can be used to promote such changes, deriving from either the physical nature and make-up of urban environments and in the way that people choose to act and behave. The project seeks to produce a step change in current knowledge and practice using a mix of new data sources, methodological innovation in analysis of this diverse data, development of new planning practices and procedures and supporting modelling tools. To this end it will provide the means to develop visions of urban futures of 2050 which are both resilient to external change and sustainable. The knowledge and procedures developed as part of this project will provide a foundation upon which planners and others involved in decision-making in relation to urban transport, at both local and national levels, can start to put in place the necessary changes to achieve the resilient and sustainable visions of 2050. (www.changing-mobilities.org.uk).

Local and Regional Climate Change Research Funded by Department for Transport. Small piece of work, jointly with Atkins. February 2010-april 2010.

This project reviewed the level of response of local authority transport departments to climate change in the UK, in particular focussing on the tools they have available and are using for determining the level of impact of the transport activity in their areas on climate. The final report is available through the DfT website: www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/regional/policy/climatechange.

Visions for the Role of Walking and Cycling to 2030. (Principal Investigator) Funded by EPSRC – project value £1.3 million. October 2008-March 2012. Jointly with the Universities of Oxford, Salford, East Anglia and Manchester.

This research sought to examine ways in which more people might be encouraged to walk and cycle in the future, what steps are needed to support this potential increase in walking and cycling and how to improve the experience for those who already use these modes. Walking and cycling can make a considerable contribution to sustainable transport goals, building healthier and more sociable communities and contributing to traffic reduction and lower carbon emissions. The amount of walking and cycling in Britain has declined over the long term and research suggests that there are major obstacles to prevent people from using these modes. There have been many national and local initiatives to promote walking and cycling but without a long term vision and consistent strategy it is difficult to see how a significant change may be achieved. The time is now right to examine the means by which such a fundamental change both in the quantity of walking and cycling, and in the quality of the experience can be achieved, which goes well beyond continuation of existing trends. The work will involve a series of expert workshops to develop visions of alternative futures and also draw in various ways on the experiences of different user groups of the public to ensure that the visions developed are grounded in real experiences. The workshops and other participation events will be used to establish trend breaking views of the future and the key attributes of future conditions which will generate these visions. We will undertake impact assessments to consider the likely costs and benefits of these visions and the potential effects on lifestyle. The work will develop and use innovative methodologies using visualisation software to help users understand how futures might appear, using modelling techniques which examine narrative and storylines to understand how different futures might be attained, and using a range of social research methods to explore how different futures might affect individual lifestyles and society. We will offer people a range of tools that enable them to construct their own versions of the future, and to weave their own stories in and out of expert visions, thus opening up the possibility of a richer and expanded public engagement with the visioning process. This permits a shift from the narrow focus of people's current day decision-making and behavioural and lifestyle choices to a greater focus on the process through which people make decisions and the contextual factors which inform how people choose to live their everyday lives. The value of this project, and the innovative methodologies it adopts, such as the new approach to modelling, is that in this way it opens up the possibilities of a greater understanding of how walking and cycling could change in the future. (www.visions2030.org.uk)

Understanding Walking and Cycling. (Co-Investigator) Funded by EPSRC – project value £1.1 million. October 2008-September 2011. Jointly with Universities of Lancaster (lead) and Oxford Brookes.

It is widely recognised that an increase in walking and cycling for short journeys in urban areas could significantly reduce traffic congestion, improve the quality of the urban environment, promote improved personal health, and contribute to a reduction in carbon emissions. This is demonstrated by a wide range of policy initiatives by national and local governments, by health authorities and a variety of non-governmental organizations. Recent reviews of research on travel behaviour have emphasised that the ways in which travel decisions are made remains poorly understood, especially in the context of complex and contingent household travel arrangements. This research sought to fill this research gap through an in-depth analysis of household decision making with respect to short journeys in urban areas and has two key aims: To develop better understanding of the complex ways in which households and individuals make everyday travel decisions about short trips in urban areas; and to develop a 'toolkit' that helps planners, policy makers and others concerned with promoting more sustainable travel practices in urban areas to target policies and interventions more effectively. The research will adopt a mixed methodology, but with the main emphasis on in-depth qualitative research, and will examine individual, family and household decision making in four different neighbourhoods. Throughout the research the project will engage with a range of stakeholders and potential users, and in the final part of the project will engage potential users with the development of outputs.
(www.lec.lancs.ac.uk/research/society_and_environment/walking_and_cycling.php).

European Union COST 358: Pedestrians’ Quality Needs. (Member of Project Management Committee) Networking grant from November 2006 – November 2010. Budget – travel and subsistence costs for meetings.

The main objective of this project was networking and the development of high quality collaborative research proposals in the area of pedestrians quality needs. The study focussed of three perspectives, functionality of the pedestrian environment, perception of that environment by the users and durability. The project aimed to provide an essential contribution to systems knowledge of pedestrians’ quality needs, thus stimulating structural and functional interventions, policy making and regulation to support an improved pedestrian environment across the EU and other involved countries. The project involves invited experts in this field from 26 countries in Europe and elsewhere. (www.walkeurope.org/final_report/default.asp)

MIME (Market-based impact mitigation for the environment). (Co-Investigator) Funded through the EU Aeronautics and Space programme. August 2007 – December 2010. Project value 4.5 million euros. Project partners include: SINTEF, Norway (coordinating partner); EUROCONTROL Experimental Centre, Belgium; ENVISA SAS, France; QinetiQ Ltd, UK; Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany; National Aerospace Laboratory, Netherlands.

The MIME project sought to enhance the environmental performance of the air transportation systems by employing market-based methods addressing noise control. These methods are innovative in that they bring an entirely new paradigm to bear on the control of noise around airports. The MIME project aims to develop a system of transferable noise permits that would be initially allocated to airlines along with an equitable means by which the chosen system would be put into place at an airport.

Transport policy appraisal and the development of a city scale carbon emissions accounting tool. (Principal Investigator) Funded through the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research II (Project value £70,000). July 2006-December 2008. Linked to other research in the Tyndall Cities programme being undertaken by the Universities of Loughborough, Newcastle, Manchester, Cambridge and University College London.

This research aimed to develop an emissions accounting tool which will permit the estimation of carbon emissions from transport activity in London and potentially other cities and regions. The project assessed current and future emissions up to 2050, taking account of projected changes in vehicle use, economic development, demography and land-use. Emissions will be estimated for both a business as usual scenario and simulating the carbon reduction effects of a range of potential policy measures. Emissions from both freight and personal transport will be considered. This research is part of a wider effort looking at the impact of London on climate change (and the impact of climate change on London) more generally and will interact with other aspects of the Tyndall Cities research theme which will be looking at land-use and demographic change, flood risk and economic well-being.

TRANSLINK (Transportation research links for sustainable development). (Co-investigator) Funded through the EU Asia-Link programme (project value: 399960 euro). August 2005-August 2008.

This project linked two European universities (the Royal Technical University of Stockholm or ‘KTH’ and the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds or ‘ITS’) with two major universities in Indonesia and Malaysia (Universitas Indonesia or ‘UI’, in Jakarta and Universiti Teknologi Mara or ‘UiTM’, in Shah Alam). The main aim of the project was to develop the capability for running transport PhD programmes specifically in the two SE Asian universities involved, but also more generally within universities in the two countries involved. The work considered both the procedural aspects of PhD programmes, issues in relation to the training of supervisors and the development of appropriate topics and associated research programmes. We contributed to this project through the provision of appropriate courses in Malaysia and Indonesia and through providing guidance to potential research supervisors and research students.

Other activities

  • Guest editor of special edition of the journal Built Environment on The role of walking and cycling in advancing healthy and sustainable cities. December 2010.
  • Member of EPSRC Peer Review College January 2006 – December 2009 and re-elected for period 2010-2012.
  • Member of Editorial Advisory Panel for the Journal Engineering Sustainability (2009-2012).
  • External examiner Transport Masters programmes Transport Studies Group, Department of Civil and Building Engineering, University of Loughborough, 2009-2012.
  • Invited member of the International Scientific Committee for the Indonesian Inter University Forum for Transport Studies (FSTPT).
  • International Reviewer for the Civil Engineering Forum (Forum Teknik Sipil) University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.
  • Member of the Steering Committee on Personal Carbon Trading for the Royal Society of Arts CarbonLimited Initiative, 2006-2008. Developing advice to government on the potential for carbon trading in the transport sector.
  • Member of the Commission for Integrated Transport Academic/Expert framework. December 2005 – November 2007 – Providing advice to CfIT on the content of their research programme.

Publications

Books/Book Chapters

  • Colin Pooley, Dave Horton, Griet Scheldeman, Miles Tight, Helen Harwatt, Ann Jopson, Tim Jones and Alison Chisholm (in press) Can increased walking and cycling really contribute to the reduction of transport related carbon emissions? In T. Ryley and L. Chapman (Eds) Transport and Climate Change (Bingley Emerald).
  • Tight, M.R. (2012) Visions 2030 – walking (and cycling) friendly cities. In Albrecht, V. And Hass-Klau, C. (2012) (eds.) Zu Fuss in die Stadt der Zukunft. Kirschbaum Verlag GmbH, Bonn.
  • Rob Methorst, Hector Monterde-i-Bort, Ralf Risser, Daniel Sauter, Miles Tight and Jim Walker (2010) (eds.) Pedestrians' Quality Needs. Final report of the EU COST 358 project. ISBN 978-0-9566903-0-2. (available through: http://www.walkeurope.org/final_report/default.asp).
  • Hall, J.W., Dawson, R.J., Walsh, C.L. Barker, T., Barr, S.L., Batty, M., Bristow, A.L., Burton, A., Carney, S., Dagoumas, A, Evans, S., Ford, A.C., Glenis, V., Goodess, C.G., Harpham, C., Harwatt, H., Kilsby, C., Kohler, J., Jones, P., Manning, L., Mccarthy, M., Sanderson, M., Tight, M.R., Timms, P.M., and Zanni, A.M. (2009) Engineering cities: how can cities grow whilst reducing emissions and vulnerability? Newcastle University ISBN 978-007017-0225-0.
  • Dawson, Richard, Hall, Jim, Barr, Stuart, Batty, Mike, Bristow, Abigail, Carney, Sebastian, Dagoumas, Athanasios, Evans, Stephen, Ford, Alistair, Harwatt, Helen, Kohler, Jonathan, Tight, Miles, Walsh, Claire and Zanni, Alberto (2009) A blueprint for the integrated assessment of climate change in cities. In Tang, Kenny (2009) Green CITYnomics: the urban war against climate change. Greenleaf Publishing, Sheffield.
  • Tight, M.R, Bristow, A.L., Page, M and Milne, D. (2000) Transport: A vision for the future. Landor Publishing.

Refereed Journals

  • Jones, T., Pooley, C., Scheldeman, G., Horton, D., Tight, M., Mullen, C., Jopson, A, and Whiteing, A. (in press) ‘Moving around the city: discourses on walking and cycling in English urban areas’. Environment and Planning A.
  • Ngoduy, D., Watling, D., Timms, P. and Tight, M. (accepted for publication) Dynamic Bayesian belief network to model the development of walking and cycling schemes. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation.
  • Gudmundsson, H., Ericsson, E., Tight, M.R., Lawler, M., Envall, P., Figueroa, M. and Evanth, K. (2012) The role of decision support in the implementation of “sustainable transport” plans. European Planning Studies, Vol 20 (2), pp 171-191.
  • Tight, M., Timms, P., Banister, D., Bowmaker, J., Copas, J., Day, A., Drinkwater, D., Givoni, M., Guehnemann, A., Lawler, M., Macmillen, J., Miles, A., Moore, N., Newton, R., Ngoduy, D., Ormerod, M., O’Sullivan, M., Watling, D. (2011) Visions for a walking and cycling focussed urban transport system. Journal of Transport Geography. Vol 19 (6), pp 1580-1589.
  • Pooley, C., Horton, D., Scheldeman, G., Tight, M., Harwatt, H., Jopson, A., Jones, T., Chisholm, A. (2011) ‘Household decision-making for everyday travel: a case study of walking and cycling in Lancaster (UK)’ Journal of Transport Geography. Vol 19(6), pp 1601-1607.
  • Kelly, C.E., Tight, M.R., Hodgson, F.C. and Page M.W. (2011) A comparison of three methods for assessing the walkability of the pedestrian environment. Journal of Transport Geography. Vol 19 (6), pp1500-1508.
  • Henrik Gudmundsson; Mary Lawler; Maria J Figueroa and Miles Tight (2011) How does transport policy cope with climate challenges? Experiences from the UK and other European countries Journal of Transportation Engineering, Vol 137, No 6, pp383-392.
  • Walsh CL; Dawson RJ; Hall JW; Barr SL; Batty M; Bristow AL; Carney S; Dagoumas A; Ford AC; Harpham C; Tight MR; Watters H; Zanni A. (2011) Assessment of climate change mitigation & adaptation in cities. Urban Design and Planning 2011, 164 (2), 75-84.
  • Harwatt, H., Tight, M. and Timms, P. (2011) Personal transport emissions within London: Exploring policy scenarios and carbon reductions up to 2050. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, Vol 5 (5), pp 270-288.
  • Harwatt, H., Tight, M., Bristow, A. and Guehnemann, A. (2011) Public response to personal carbon trading and fuel price increases in the transport sector: Empirical findings from the UK. European Transport, Number 47 (Special issue on New Frontiers of Transport Research), pp 47-70.
  • Timms, P. and Tight, M. (2010) Aesthetic aspects of walking and cycling. Built Environment, special edition on: The role of walking and cycling in advancing healthy and sustainable cities. Vol 36, Number 4, pp 487-503.
  • Tight, M.R. and Givoni, M. (2010) The role of walking and cycling in advancing healthy and sustainable urban areas. Built Environment, special edition on: The role of walking and cycling in advancing healthy and sustainable cities. Editorial. Vol 36, Number 4, pp 385-390.
  • Thomopoulos, N., Grant-Muller, S. and Tight, M.R. (2009) Incorporating equity considerations in transport infrastructure evaluation: Current practice and a proposed methodology. Evaluation and Program Planning Vol 32 (4), pp 351-359.
  • Bristow, A.L., Tight, M.R., Pridmore, A. and May, A.D. (2008) Developing pathways to low carbon land-based passenger transport in Great Britain by 2050. Energy Policy., Vol 36, pp 3427-3435.
  • Tight, M.R., Vicat, A., Bristow, A.L., Pridmore, A. and May, A.D. (2007) An exploration of household response to personal travel carbon-reduction targets. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, Volume 1 (3), pp 143-159.
  • Wardman, M., Tight, M.R. and Page, M (2007) Factors influencing the propensity to cycle to work. Transportation Research A, Vol 41 (2007), pp 339-350.
  • Conche, F. and Tight, M.R. (2006) Use of CCTV to determine road accident factors in urban areas. Accident Analysis and Prevention. Vol 38 (6), pp 1197-1207.
  • May, A.D. and Tight, M.R. (2006) Innovation and Integration in Urban Transport Policy. Transport Policy Vol 13 (4), pp 281-282.
  • Malkhamah, S., Tight, M.R. and Montgomery, F. (2005) The development of an automatic method of safety monitoring at Pelican Crossings. Accident Analysis and Prevention. Vol 37(5), pp 938-946, September.
  • Tight, M.R., Bristow, A.L., Pridmore, A. and May, A.D. (2005) What is a sustainable level of CO2 emissions from transport activity in the UK in 2050? Transport Policy, Volume 12 (3), pp235-244.
  • Tight, M.R., Delle Site, P. and Meyer-Ruhle, O. (2004) Decoupling transport from economic growth: towards transport sustainability in Europe. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, Volume 4 (4), pp 381-404.
  • May, T., Bristow, A., Mackie, P., Nash, C. and Tight, M. (2002) The UK’s ten year transport plan: lessons for strategic planning. Traffic Engineering and Control, September, pp 352-356.
  • Tight, M.R., Delle Site, P., Hammond, A., Nellthorp, J. and Mackie, P.J. (2001) Separating the intensity of transport from economic growth. Published Proceedings of the World Conference on Transport Research, Seoul, Korea.
  • Tight, M.R., Milne, D., May, A.D., Hodgson, F.C., Gerrard, W. and Conner, M. (2001) Effectiveness of transport demand strategies when applied to historic cities. Published Proceedings of the World Conference on Transport Research, Seoul, Korea.
  • Wardman, M., Page, M. and Tight, M.R. (2001) Cycling and urban mode choice. Published Proceedings of the World Conference on Transport Research, Seoul, Korea.
  • Barbosa, H., Tight, M.R. and May, A.D. (2000) A model of speed profiles for traffic calmed roads. Transportation Research A, Vol 34A(2), pp103-123.
  • May, T., Hodgson, F., Jopson, A., Milne, D. and Tight, M.R. (2000) A comparison of four travel demand management measures. Traffic Engineering and Control, Vol 41(10), pp396-401.

Conference Presentations

  • Tight, M., Timms, P., Watling, D., Gühnemann, A., Miles, A. and Moore, N. (2011) Pathways to achieving radically different urban walking and cycling futures in the UK by 2030. Presented at the Walk21 Conference, Vancouver, October.
  • Timms, P. Tight, M, Watling, D. and Gühnemann, A. (2011) Achieving radically different urban walking and cycling futures in the UK by 2030 – imagining different pathways. Presented at the Institute for British Geographers annual conference, London, August.
  • Pooley, C., Horton, D., Scheldeman, G., Tight, M., Jopson, A., Mullen, C. and Jones, T. (2011) Understanding Walking and Cycling (UWAC): Key results and policy implications. Presented at the Institute for British Geographers annual conference, London, September.
  • MacMillen, J., Givoni, M., Newton, R. and Tight, M. (2011) Participatory planning and futures development: active travel scenarios for the UK. Presented at the Institute for British Geographers annual conference, London, September.
  • Miles, A., Moore, N., Savage, M., Tight, M., Timms, D. and Watling, D. (2011) New approaches to sustainable transport evidence and modelling paradigms for transforming travel behaviour. Making Sustainable Mobilities Interdisciplinary Perspectives conference, Munich, April 7th-8th.
  • Tight, M.R. (2010) Visions for a walking focussed urban transport system. Presented at the Walk21 Conference (Getting Communities back on their feet), The Hague, November.
  • Tight, M.R., Alves, M. and Risser, R. (2010) The future of walking. Plenary presentation at the Walk21 Conference (Getting Communities back on their feet), The Hague, November.
  • Tight, M.R. (2010) Vision 2030 – walking friendly cities. Presented at 6th International Transport Conference (On foot into the city of the future), University of Wuppertal, Germany, September.
  • Colin Pooley, Dave Horton, Griet Scheldeman, Miles Tight, Helen Harwatt, Ann Jopson, Tim Jones, Alison Chisholm and Caroline Mullen (2010) Can increased walking and cycling really contribute to the reduction of transport-related carbon emissions? Presented at the Royal Geographical Society annual conference, London, 2nd September 2010.
  • D. Ngoduy, D. Watling, P. Timms and M. Tight (2010) Dynamic Bayesian belief network to model the development of walking and cycling schemes. Presented at the 12th World Conference on Transport Research, Lisbon, July.
  • Timms, P. and Tight, M. (2010) Aesthetics and its relationship to social sustainability in urban transport systems. Presented at the 12th World Conference on Transport Research, Lisbon, July.
  • Harwatt, H., Jopson, A., Muir, H., Page, M. and Tight, M. (2010) Personal factors influencing walking and cycling in urban areas. Presented at the 12th World Conference on Transport Research, Lisbon, July.
  • Noor Z. Yahaya, Tate, J.E. and Tight, M.R. (2010) The Influence of Traffic Flow and Winds Factors on Particle Number Concentration (PNC) around an Urban Intersection. Proceedings of the 15th World Clean Air Congress, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada held on 12th – 16th September 2010.
  • Noor Z. Yahaya, Tate, J.E. and Tight, M.R. (2010) The Spatial and Temporal Variation of PNC around an urban traffic junction. Presented at the Annual Aerosol Science of UK Conference held on 8-9 April 2010.
  • Noor Z. Yahaya, Tate, J.E. and Tight, M.R. (2010) The Influence of the Traffic flow, Synoptic and In-Street winds on the Particle Number Concentration (PNC) around an Intersection. Presented at the United Kingdom-Malaysia-Ireland Engineering Science (UMIES) Conference 2010 held at Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom on 23 – 25 June 2010.
  • Tight, M.R. (2010) Developing radically different travel futures: methodological and contextual issues. Interdisciplinary Opportunities in Low-Carbon Transport seminar, Cardiff University, 7th June 2010
  • Alison Chisholm, Tim Jones, Helen Harwatt, Ann Jopson, Miles Tight, Dave Horton, Colin Pooley and Griet Scheldeman (2009) Exploring the role of the built environment in household decision making about urban walking and cycling'. Presented at the Environment, Well Being and Healthy Lifestyle 2009 conference, University of Staffordshire. October.
  • Yahaya Nz., Tate, J. E. and Tight, M.R. (2009) The monitoring and analysis of Ultra-Fine Particles (UFP) emitted from motor vehicles in the urban environment. The Annual Aerosol Society Science Conference, Galway, Ireland, 06 Apr 2009 - 07 Apr 2009. (2009)
  • Pooley, C., Chisholm, A., Harwatt, H., Horton, D., Jones, T., Jopson, A., Scheldemann, G., and Tight, M. (2009) Understanding walking and cycling: household decision making for everyday travel. Royal Geographical Society – IBG Annual Conference, Manchester, August 26th-28th.
  • Tight, M., Banister, D., Day, A., Drinkwater, D., Givoni, M., Guehnemann, A., Kimble, M., Macmillen, J., Miles, A., Moore, N., Newton, E., Ngoduy, D., Timms, P. and Watling, D. (2009) Visions of walking and cycling in 2030. Royal Geographical Society – IBG Annual Conference, Manchester, August 26th-28th.
  • Jones, T., Chisholm, A., Harwatt, H., Horton, D., Jopson, A., Pooley, C., Scheldemann, G. and Tight, M. (2009) Understanding walking and cycling: a multi-method approach to investigating household decision-making in relation to short journeys in urban areas. Cycling and Society Research Group seminar, Bolton, September 7-8..
  • Tight, M.R. (2009) Are there alternative less risky futures than continued dependence on the car? Presented at a seminar on Decarbonising the Car on 8th July at the London School of Economics Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation. July.
  • Hall, J.W, Dawson, R.J., Barr, S.L., Batty, M, Bristow, A, Carney, S, Dagoumas, A., Ford, A, Tight, M.R., Walsh, C., Watters, H. and Zanni, A (2009) City scale integrated assessment of climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation. 5th Urban Research Symposium, Marseille, France, June 28-30.
  • Tight, M., Banister, D., Day, A., Drinkwater, D., Givoni, M., Guehnemann, A., Kimble, M., Macmillen, J., Miles, A., Moore, N., Newton, E., Ngoduy, D., Timms, P. and Watling, D. (2009) Visions of walking and cycling in 2030. Walk21 Conference, New York, October 6th – 8th.
  • Tight, M.R. (2009) The role of cycling, current trends and vision for 2030 in the UK. International Symposium on Cycling Towards a Sustainable City, Incheon City, Korea, September 23-24.
  • Tight, M.R. (2008) Setting up and maintaining good supervisory practices. TRANSLINK Conference, Developing Transport Research in South East Asia, UITM, Malaysia, 1 July 2008
  • Harwatt, H., Tight, M.R. and Timms, P.M. (2008) Personal transport emissions within London: exploring policy scenarios and carbon reductions up to 2050. Presented at a Symposium on Transport and Climate Change: Status, Impacts and Future Prospects, University of Karlsruhe, November.
  • Thomopoulos, N., Grant-Muller, S. and Tight, M.R. (2008) Evaluation of an (MCA) equity appraisal framework through a TEN-T case study. Presented at the European Transport Conference, October.
  • Thomopoulos, N., Grant-Muller, S. and Tight, M.R. (2008) Meeting the equity objective of large transport infrastructure projects: An alternative to CBA. 3rd International Conference on Funding Transportation Infrastructure, 20-21 June 2008 Paris, France.
  • Dawson, R.J., Hall, J.W., Barr, S.L., Batty, M, Bristow, A, Carney, S, Evans, S, Ford, A, Kohler, J, Tight, M.R., Walsh, C., Watters, H. and Zanni, A (2008) Climate change and cities. Proc Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation: Dangerous Rates of Change. Exeter 22-24 september.
  • Kelly, C.E., Tight, M.R., Page, M.W. and Hodgson, F.C. (2007) Techniques for assessing the walkability of the pedestrian environment. Proceedings of the Walk21 Conference, Toronto, October.
  • Watters, H. Tight, M.R. and Bristow, A.L. (2007) Achieving low carbon city transport systems: a case study based on London. Proceedings of the European Transport Conference, October.
  • Kimble, M. Tight, M.R. and Gudmundsson, H. (2007) The effectiveness of national transport strategies as a means to promote the development of more sustainable transport systems. Proceedings of the European Transport Conference, October.
  • Thomopoulos, N., Grant-Muller, S. and Tight, M.R. (2007) Can equity be included in appraisal of large transport infrastructure projects? A review of past European practice and principles. Presented at the NECTAR conference, Porto, Portugal, May.
  • Watters, H, Tight, M.R. and Bristow, A.L. (2006) The relative acceptability of Tradable Carbon Permits and fuel price increases as means to reduce CO2 emissions from road transport by 60%. Presented at the European Transport Conference, Strasbourg, October 2006.
  • Bristow, A.L., Pridmore, A., Tight, M. and May, A.D. (2004) Low Carbon Transport Futures: How Acceptable Are They? Presented at the 10th World Conference on Transport Research, Istanbul, 4-8 July 2004.
  • Pridmore, A.M.; Bristow, Tight, M.R, Balmforth, P. and May, A.D. (2004) Application of an innovative interview technique for exploring households’ adaptation strategies in reducing CO2 emissions from transport. In: European Transport Conference, Strasbourg, October 2004.
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