Rosamaria Giammanco

 

Doctoral researcher

Department of English Literature

Rosamaria Giammanco

Contact details

About

PhD title: Souvenirs from everywhere: Transnationalism, Globalization and Canadian Citizenship in the oeuvre of Douglas Coupland
Supervisor: Dr Danielle Fuller
PhD American and Canadian Studies

Qualifications

  • BA (Hons) Education Studies and English, 2.1, University of Wolverhampton, 2004
  • MA in English Language and Literature (specializing in North American literature), with Distinction, Leiden University, 2006
  • MA in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Leiden University, 2007

Biography

Rosamaria (Rosa) Giammanco is a PhD candidate in American and Canadian Studies at the University of Birmingham. She is interested in Douglas Coupland’s work, transnationalism, globalization, citizenship, cosmopolitanism and hyphen-immigrant literature.

Rosamaria holds an M.A. in English Language and Literature from the University of Leiden, an M.A. in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from the University of Leiden and a B.A. (2.1 hons) in Education studies and English from the University of Wolverhampton. 

Doctoral research

PhD title Souvenirs from everywhere: Transnationalism, Globalization and Canadian Citizenship in the oeuvre of Douglas Coupland

Publications

Conference papers:

2007 “Nihonjin or Gaijin? Searching for the Japanese American Identity in a Hostile Society” Netherlands American Studies Association (NASA). Paper presented at annual conference of the Netherlands American Studies Association

2010 “North-American Immigrant Literature in the Classroom” IATEFL (Harrogate). Paper presented at the International Association for Teachers of English as a Foreign Language

2010 “Father’s past: William Kurelek and his painted stories” French Canadian Studies Association (Avignon) Paper presented at the annual conference of the French Canadian Studies Association

2013 "Morphing identities: globalization and the end of times in Douglas Coupland's Generation A and Player One" British Association for Canadian Studies (British Library, London). Paper presented at the annual conference of the British Association for Canadian Studies 

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