The Priestley Lecture with speaker Baroness Estelle Morris

Locations
Lecture Theatre G15 in the Muirhead Tower – R21 on the Edgbaston campus map
Category
Lectures Talks and Workshops, Social Sciences, Students
Date(s)
Thursday 27th March 2014 (17:30-18:30)
Contact

This event is now closed for registration. If you wish to attend, please contact Emma Kneale (e.f.kneale@bham.ac.uk) and you will be added to a waiting list

For all other enquiries, please contact:
Caroline Baxter, PA to Head of School
Email: c.a.p.baxter@bham.ac.uk 
Tel:. 0121 414 4831

The Priestley Lecture

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Description
Baroness Estelle Morris

Politics and Education – at a time of continuous change is there more continuity than we realise?

Speaker Baroness Estelle Morris started her career in education as a teacher in an inner city multiracial comprehensive school where she taught for 18 years. In 1992 she entered Parliament as MP for Birmingham and in 2001 she became the Secretary of State for Education and Skills. She followed this with two years as a Minister at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport and left Parliament in 2005.

Since then Estelle has combined a career that includes senior posts both in education and the arts as well as being a member of the House of Lords.

She now works at the Institute of Effective Education at the University of York which aims to transform the relationship between education research and practice so that policy making and teaching can become more evidence-based.

She is a trustee of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation and The Roundhouse Trust. She also chairs the Council at Goldsmiths College.

She is a regular contributor to Guardian Education.

We want to ensure you enjoy your visit to the University of Birmingham. Please contact us if you have any special requirements or require assistance.

Cost: Free of Charge but registration essential

Venue: Lecture Theatre G15, ground floor in the Muirhead Tower

Sir Raymond Priestley was the Vice-Chancellor of The University of Birmingham from 1938 to 1952. He was a great supporter of the education of teachers and in 1959 it was decided to name this annual lecture after him.