Professor Christine Skelton

Professor of Gender Equality in Education

School of Education

Contact details

School of Education
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2TT, United Kingdom

About

Christine Skelton is Professor of Gender Equality in Education.

Qualifications

  • Ph.D (Warwick)
  • MA (York)
  • BA (Open)

Teaching

Christine teaches on undergraduate and postgraduate modules in Education.

She currently supervises Ph.D students studying subjects such as gender and educational leadership in children’s centres, the perceptions of LGBTQ students of school policies and practices, gender and the female art teacher, and mature students on early years foundation programmes.

Postgraduate supervision

Christine is interested in the following research topics: Gender and education, Achievement and primary schooling, Men and women teachers

The profiles for one of her postgraduate research students may be viewed below

 

Claire Largen - An investigation into the experiences of progression and transition from Foundation Degree (FdA) to Bachelor of Arts (BA) for part-time, mature, female students

Research

Her research interests are in gender and education but Christine’s particular interests are in achievement and primary schooling. She has undertaken studies funded by the ESRC into whether 7-8 year old children prefer to be taught by men or women teachers and how high achieving boys and girls in secondary school manage to be both popular and high achieving. Christine has researched widely into the experiences and perceptions of men teachers in primary schools and is critical of the current drive to recruit teachers simply on the basis of their male gender.

Together with her colleague, Becky Francis (Director of Education at the Royal Society of Arts), Christine wrote Feminism and 'The Schooling Scandal', a book aimed at undergraduates that explored thirty years of feminist contribution in the UK to knowledge and understanding of gender inequities in schooling. The book was awarded first prize by the Society of Educational Studies in 2010 for quality, originality and its success at relating theory to practice.

Other activities

 

  • Editorial Consultant for Discourse: studies in the cultural politics of education.

Publications

Selected Publications

Weaver-Hightower, M.B. and Skelton, C. (eds) (2013) Leaders in Gender and Education (Sense).

Francis, B., Skelton, C. and Read, B. (2012) The Identities and Practices of High Achieving Pupils (Continuum).

Skelton, C and Francis, B. (2011) Successful Boys and Literacy: are literate boys challenging or repackaging hegemonic masculinity? Curriculum Enquiry. 41, 4, 456-479 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-873X.2011.00559.x

Skelton, C and Francis, B. (2011) The Renaissance Child: High Achievement and Gender in Late Modernity, International Journal of Inclusive Education. DOI:10.1080/13603116.2011.555098

C Skelton, B Francis, B Read. 2011. Gender, Popularity and Notions of In/Authenticity amongst 12-13yr old School Girls, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 21, 2, 169-183. DOI 10.1080/01425692.2011.547304

Skelton, C., Francis, B. & Read, B. (2010) 'Brains before ‘Beauty?’ High Achieving Girls, School and Gender Identities, Educational Studies, 36(2): 185-194.

Francis, B., Skelton, C. & Read, B. (2010) ‘The simultaneous production of educational achievement and popularity: how do some pupils accomplish it?’ British Educational Research Journal, 36(2): 317-340 Skelton bookcoverDOI: 10.1080/03055690903162366

Skelton, C. and Francis, B. (2009) Feminism and ‘The Schooling Scandal’ (Routledge).

Skelton, C. (2009) Failing to get men into primary teaching: a feminist critique, Journal of Education Policy, 24(1): 39-54.

Skelton, C., Carrington, B., Francis, B., Hutchings, M. Read, B. and Hall, I. (2009) Gender ‘Matters’ in the Primary Classroom: Pupils’ and Teachers’ Perspectives, British Educational Research Journal, 35(2): 187-204. 

Expertise

Gender and schooling, in particular, the gender gap in achievement

Expertise

Gender and schooling, in particular the gender gap in achievement

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