News 

Keep up to date with the latest news and events from around the department and the wide-ranging projects our staff and students get involved with. More news throughout the School of Government and Society

Latest news

Posted 21 April 2016

Blog: The May local elections: A selection of those in the metropolitan boroughs

Written by Chris Game. Chris Game is a Visiting Lecturer at INLOGOV interested in the politics of local government; local elections, electoral reform and other electoral behaviour; party politics; political leadership and management; member-officer relations; central-local relations; use of consumer and opinion research in local government; the modernisation agenda and the implementation of executive local government.

Posted 06 April 2016

Blog: BRITISH OVERSEAS TERRITORIES: The dilemma for intervening in tax havens

Written by Dr Philip Whiteman. Dr Philip Whiteman is Teaching Quality Assurance Lead at the School of Government and Society and Director of Education at the Institute of Local Government Studies at the University of Birmingham. He has research interests in the impact of central government and regulators on the role, service delivery and performance of local government and other local bodies.

Posted 16 March 2016

Total Leadership: the development programme for high performers

This year sees the launch of an entirely new leadership programme, devised by Solace and Inlogov. Total Leadership combines a state-of-the-art digital learning platform (where you'll have exclusive access to key research, evidence and cutting-edge thinking) with residential modules that will build on your individual learning, offering space to learn from experienced practitioners and creating a transformative shift in your leadership capacity.

Posted 29 February 2016

Blog: Combined Authorities and Del Boy Devolution

Written by Chris Game, a Visiting Lecturer at INLOGOV interested in the politics of local government; local elections, electoral reform and other electoral behaviour; party politics; political leadership and management; member-officer relations; central-local relations; use of consumer and opinion research in local government; the modernisation agenda and the implementation of executive local government.

Posted 04 February 2016

Blog: Designing in Collaboration: Challenges for the new Combined Authorities

Written by Max Lempriere and Vivien Lowndes. At a workshop hosted in December 2015 by City-REDI, INLOGOV, The Public Services Academy at the University of Birmingham practitioners and academics from the world of local government came together to share experiences on the current Combined Authorities and city-region devolution agenda. In the fifth of a series of posts Max Lempriere and Vivien Lowndes reflect on the day's major talking points.

Posted 02 December 2015

Complete our Online Survey and win an iPad

We want to ensure you and your colleagues are able to make use of our ideas and engage with us is in a way that's convenient, accessible and most importantly useful to you. As someone who works in this sector, we would be grateful to hear your views.

Posted 16 October 2015

Building better collaboration

The District Council's Network has commissioned INLOGOV to undertake a programme of research into collaborative and partnership working in local government. The project was mostly centred on partnership projects led by or promoted by districts, but contains many insights into good collaborative behaviour that will be of interest both to wider local government and to bodies that regularly partner with councils.

Posted 14 September 2015

Corbyn could save Labour from electoral wipeout

Written by Chris Game, Honorary Senior Lecturer, INLOGOV. If Labour can turn its fiasco of a leadership election into a voter registration drive, it can push back against a rigged system.

Posted 24 July 2015

Blog: Combined Authorities – Why Birmingham doesn't have a city region like Leeds

Written by Chris Game. "Cornwall leapfrogs West Midlands in devolution race" was the headline over one report of the Government's recent devolution deal with Cornwall Council, giving the county greater control over adult skills spending and regional investment, and, with the Isles of Scilly, the prospect of integrating health and social care services.

Posted 16 July 2015

Blog: Is a 120-member council really too big?

Written by Chris Game. "This blog's main purpose is to place somewhere in the public domain some basic electoral data on council size. Basic, but not normally presented in a form that I've sometimes wanted for illustrative purposes. I'm hoping, therefore, there may be others who'll find the data of at least passing interest, so here goes."

Posted 24 June 2015

Blog: Do 'sticky' institutions always survive? The demise of the Audit Commission

Written by Katherine Tonkiss. "The Audit Commission played a central role in the audit, inspection, performance improvement and regulation of local authorities (and other public service providers) in England for over thirty years. Operating at arm's length from government, it thrived under the efficiency and performance improvement agendas of successive Conservative and Labour governments, growing into a large and powerful public body."

Posted 12 June 2015

Blog: Recall – right for councillors, right for mayors

Written by Chris Game. "The topical, and certainly most agreeable, purpose of this blog is to applaud the appointment of illustrator, cartoonist and writer, Chris Riddell, as the ninth Children's Laureate. The enviably talented Riddell has been The Observer's political cartoonist for 20 years and is also a writer and multi-award-winning illustrator of children's books. But before any of that fame and fortune, he generously provided easily the most eye-catching half-page in an INLOGOV undergraduate degree recruitment brochure.

Posted 22 May 2015

Blog: A new typology of local government systems

Written by Pawel Swianiewicz. "Typologies of the European systems of local government are important and frequent point of reference for many scholars. But the trouble for scholars from my part of Europe is that the most popular classifications concentrate on Western part of the continent, totally disregarding the post-communist Central and Eastern Europe."