Centre for Russian and East European Studies (CREES)

Two PhD Studentships Available for CREES Students.CREES 50th AnniversarySchool of Government and Society enhancing your student experience

The Centre for Russian and East European Studies (CREES) is one of the world's leading research institutes in its field. CREES is a multi-disciplinary centre with a strong orientation towards the social sciences and history. CREES is an integrated part of the Department of Political Science and International Studies although associate members of CREES are based in many different departments across the university.

While our expertise is firmly grounded in the former states of the USSR and Eastern Europe, we recognise the global importance of this region. This is reflected in CREES' research and teaching interests that cut across Eastern and Western Europe.

Undergraduate degrees

Undergraduate degrees

The Centre for Russian and East European Studies offers a highly flexible degree programme, with a range of options within each year:

Undergraduate degrees

Doctoral Research

Doctoral Research

CREES is a research oriented, multi disciplinary centre with wide ranging expertise and long standing excellence in researching Russia and Eastern Europe.

Doctoral Research

Latest Research

Latest Research

CREES has been very successful in obtaining external research grants, for example from the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and UK Government departments.

Latest Research

Latest news

50 faces of CREES #52 - Paul Barton, B.Com (Russian Studies) 1964-67

50 faces of CREES #52 - Paul Barton, B.Com (Russian Studies) 1964-67
Description
When I arrived in 1964, the Social Sciences buildings were very new. I returned in 1999, when my daughter was visiting potential universities, and it looked very down-at-heel. One of the great advantages of CREES was having our own library, which served as both a study area and a social centre - a common room of sorts - where students from all the years mixed and chatted.
Date:
Thursday 24th April 2014

Blog: Should I stay or should I go? Why the UK should stay out of the Crimea issue

Blog: Should I stay or should I go? Why the UK should stay out of the Crimea issue
Description
Iván Farías, Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Political Science and International Studies argues why the UK should stay out of the Crimea issue.
Date:
Thursday 24th April 2014

The Conversation: Breakthrough in Ukraine talks is a win-win situation, especially for Russia

The Conversation: Breakthrough in Ukraine talks is a win-win situation, especially for Russia
Description
Written by Professor Stefan Wolff. The four-party talks on the crisis in Ukraine have apparently produced a significant breakthrough towards the diffusion of an increasingly dangerous situation.
Date:
Friday 18th April 2014

The Conversation: Ukraine crisis: is the West powerless to stop Russian aggression?

The Conversation: Ukraine crisis: is the West powerless to stop Russian aggression?
Description
Written by Professor Stefan Wolff. As the situation in Ukraine rapidly spins out of control, various Western leaders have stepped up their verbal warnings to Russia.
Date:
Tuesday 15th April 2014

The Conversation: Now Crimea's in the bag, where next for Putin and Russia?

The Conversation: Now Crimea's in the bag, where next for Putin and Russia?
Description
Written by Professor Stefan Wolff and Professor Tatyana Malyarenko (Professor of Public Administration at Donetsk State Management University). The Ukrainian government has announced that it will mount a full-scale military operation to regain control of the east of the country and has set a deadline of 6am on Monday morning for occupied government buildings to be evacuated by armed protesters.
Date:
Tuesday 15th April 2014

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