Latest research news

The latest research news from around the School of Government and Society.

Kenya attack: al-Shabaab's violent radicalism can't be tackled by force alone

Kenya attack: al-Shabaab's violent radicalism can't be tackled by force alone
Description
Written by Professor Stefan Wolff. The terrorist group al-Shabaab has claimed an attack on Garissa University College in eastern Kenya, in which an unclear number have been killed and many others taken hostage.
Date:
Friday 10th April 2015

Iran celebrates historic nuclear deal – all eyes now on supreme leader

Iran celebrates historic nuclear deal – all eyes now on supreme leader
Description
Written by Professor Scott Lucas. Finally, after years of diplomacy and brinkmanship, the long-awaited nuclear deal with Iran has been done. There is jubilation in the streets as Iran's people, who have struggled under the weight of western sanctions for decades, are waking up to the prospect of a brighter economic future.
Date:
Friday 10th April 2015

Blog: Council Tax Support – anatomy of a Pickles' localism triumph

Blog: Council Tax Support – anatomy of a Pickles' localism triumph
Description
Written by Chris Game. Shortly before the dissolution of Parliament, Communities and Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles issued an apparently self-penned eulogy of his ministerial record, entitled on the Government's own website, in characteristic, cod Churchillian, style: Local Government: Delivering for England. It makes an interesting document, as would be hoped of one requiring two separate links.
Date:
Friday 10th April 2015

Are the Conservatives really about to increase minority representation?

Are the Conservatives really about to increase minority representation?
Description
Written by Chris Game, Honorary Senior Lecturer, INLOGOV. The Sunday Times recently ran a pretty incredible headline, claiming that in the 2015 election, "Tories may secure most ethnic MPs". This would represent a huge turnaround. Ten years ago – and 18 years after the all-Labour quartet of Dianne Abbott, Paul Boateng, Bernie Grant, and Keith Vaz had become the UK's first post-war black and minority ethnic (BME) MPs – the Conservatives didn't have a single one.
Date:
Thursday 2nd April 2015

Blog: Authoritarianism and the securitization of development in Africa

Blog: Authoritarianism and the securitization of development in Africa
Description
Written by Jonathan Fisher, lecturer in IDD. Jonathan Fisher and David M. Anderson published the article: Authoritarianism and the securitization of development in Africa this January, 2015. We asked Jonathan what drives his research interest in this field and to address some of the issues captured in the article.
Date:
Thursday 2nd April 2015

Germanwings crash: the ins and outs of the two-person rule

Germanwings crash: the ins and outs of the two-person rule
Description
Written by Daniel Rio Tinto, Doctoral Researcher in POLSIS. It takes two people to launch a nuclear missile - it's time the same level of safety returned to the cockpit.
Date:
Monday 30th March 2015

Blog: The cyber threat to the United Kingdom

Blog: The cyber threat to the United Kingdom
Description
Written by Gavin Hall, Doctoral Researcher in POLSIS. When the new government takes office in May 2015 one of the first tasks will be to initiate a Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR).
Date:
Monday 30th March 2015

POLSIS academic interviewed by Turkish Weekly

POLSIS academic interviewed by Turkish Weekly
Description
Dr Marco Vieira shared his views with the Turkish Weekly on Brazil and the Responsibility to Protect Doctrine.
Date:
Thursday 26th March 2015

Blog: Queen Cersei and the evaporating Revenue Support Grant

Blog: Queen Cersei and the evaporating Revenue Support Grant
Description
Written by Chris Game, Visiting Lecturer at INLOGOV. Next week is the last week of Hilary Term, or revision week at the end of Spring Term, as it's known here at the UoB and most other universities who feel no great affinity to the probably inappropriately named 4th Century St Hilarius of Poitiers. Over the many years in which I lectured undergraduates, I used rather to like it: end of the course/module in sight, legitimate chance to share and spread gossip about approaching local elections, lecture attendances boosted by students desperate for exam hints. Plus, nowadays, plenty of discussion-prompting visual aids – one of which is the pretext for this blog.
Date:
Friday 20th March 2015

Understanding the Post-Crisis Landscape: Assessing Change in Economic Management, Welfare, Work and Democracy

Understanding the Post-Crisis Landscape: Assessing Change in Economic Management, Welfare, Work and Democracy
Description
This seminar introduced a 6-seminar ESRC seminar series: Understanding the Post-Crisis Landscape: Assessing Change in Economic Management, Welfare, Work and Democracy. It highlighted and contested contemporary political economy approaches to macroeconomic management, welfare, work, and democracy, in the light of the global economic crisis - thereby setting the scene for four subsequent seminars to explore each of these themes in more depth.
Date:
Friday 20th March 2015
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