Professor Nicholas J. Wheeler

Professor of International Relations
Director of the The Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security

Department of Political Science and International Studies

Nick Wheeler

Contact details

Telephone +44 (0)121 414 6215

Telephone (2) Tina Aston: +44 (0)121 414 8398

Email n.j.wheeler@bham.ac.uk

Tina Aston, PA to Director of ICCS t.aston@bham.ac.uk

Department of Political Science and International Studies
School of Government and Society
Muirhead Tower
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston, Birmingham,
B15 2TT, United Kingdom

About

Nicholas J. Wheeler is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation, and Security at the University of Birmingham.

His publications include (with Mlada Bukovansky, Ian Clark, Robyn Eckersley, Christian Reus-Smit, and Richard Price), Special Responsibilities: Global Problems and American Power (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2012); (with Ken Booth) The Security Dilemma: Fear, Cooperation, and Trust in World Politics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008); (edited with Jean-Marc Coicaud) National Interest Versus Solidarity: Particular and Univeral Ethics in International Life (Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 2008); (with Ian Clark) The British Origins of Nuclear Strategy 1945-55 (Oxford: Oxford University Press). He is the author of Saving Strangers: Humanitarian Intervention in International Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000) and is currently writing a book provisionally entitled Trusting Enemies.  This is a key output of a 3-year ESRC/AHRC Fellowship on ‘The Challenges to Trust-Building in Nuclear Worlds (awarded under RCUK’s ‘Global Uncertainties: Security For All in a Changing World’ programme. He is co-editor with Professor Christian Reus-Smit of the prestigious Cambridge Series in International Relations.

Teaching

PhD opportunities

Research

Current and recent reserach projects

Saving Humans: Risk, Intervention, Survival
'Saving Humans' is an innovative and timely theme which consolidates existing University research agendas, provides opportunities for creating novel and exciting partnerships, transcends divides between arts, social sciences and natural sciences and, most importantly, addresses broader issues of social, political and moral concern for humanity’s future.
Theme Leaders: Professor Heather WiddowsProfessor Paul Jackson and Professor Nick Wheeler.

Publications

His publications include:

Mlada Bukovansky, Ian Clark, Robyn Eckersley, Christian Reus-Smit, and Richard Price, and Nicholas J. Wheeler, Special Responsibilities: Global Problems and American Power (Cambridge University Press, 2012), 290 pp.

Ken Booth and Nicholas J. Wheeler, The Security Dilemma: Fear, Cooperation, and Trust in World Politics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), 272 pp.

Nicholas J. Wheeler, Saving Strangers: Humanitarian Intervention in International Society (Oxford: OUP, 2000), 336pp.

Ian Clark and Nicholas J. Wheeler, The British Origins of Nuclear Strategy, 1945-55 (Oxford: Clarendon Press: 1989), 263pp.

Timothy Dunne and Nicholas J. Wheeler (eds.), Human Rights in Global Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 337pp.

Jean-Marc Coicaud and Nicholas J. Wheeler (eds.), National Interest and International Solidarity: Particular and Universal Ethics in International Life (Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 2008), 317pp.

Colin McInnes and Nicholas J. Wheeler (eds.), Dimensions of Military Intervention (London: Frank Cass, 2002), 202pp.

He is the author of Saving Strangers: Humanitarian Intervention in International Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000) and is currently writing a book provisionally entitled Trusting Rivals: Alternative Paths to Security in the Nuclear Age. This is a key output of a 3-year ESRC/AHRC Fellowship on ‘The Challenges to Trust-Building in Nuclear Worlds (awarded under RCUK’s ‘Global Uncertainties: Security For All in a Changing World’ programme.

He is co-editor with Professor Christian Reus-Smit of the prestigious Cambridge Series in International Relations.

Back to top