Dr Manbinder Sidhu

Research Fellow in Primary Care Clinical Sciences

Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Contact details

Primary Care Clinical Sciences
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Manbinder Sidhu, PhD, is a research fellow working in health services research with a background in sociology. Dr Sidhu has a specific interest in understanding the health needs of minority-ethnic groups living in developed countries and people living with chronic diseases.

Manbinder specialises in:

-       Interpreting health beliefs and practices

-       Self-management

-       Mixed methods and methodologies

-       Patient and public involvement  

Qualifications

  • BA (Hons) Sociology, University of Birmingham, 2009
  • PhD, Public Health,  University of Birmingham, 2012

Biography

Manbinder was born and raised in the West Midlands, and has a continuing relationship with the University of Birmingham. Having completing his bachelor’s degree, Manbinder went on to complete his PhD, funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) through the Collaborations for Leadership In Applied Health Care and Research- Birmingham and Black Country (CLAHRC-BBC) programme in the School of Health and Population Sciences, contributing to the field of health services research. On completion, Manbinder moved to Primary Care Clinical Sciences to further his research. 

Currently, his main research projects are:

  • Patient self-management in primary care patients with COPD- a randonised controlled trial
  • Lighten Up Plus: a randomised controlled trial of a weight maintenance programme with SMS support
  • Photo Voice- a qualitative study exploring attitudes towards health and wellbeing across an ethnically diverse population

Teaching

Manbinder continues to deliver lectures on the Masters in Public Health programme. He has delivered lectures on the following modules: 

  • Health Promotion
  • Sociology and Social Policy
  • Qualitative Research Methods

Manbinder also delivers small group teaching sessions (SGTs), Medicine and Surgery MBChB, University of Birmingham.  

Postgraduate supervision

Manbinder is interested in supervising doctoral research students in the following areas: 

  • Cultural adaptation of behavioural change and self-management programmes for whole populations or ethnic-minority groups
  • Self-management of chronic diseases 
  • The role of social networks and systems of support in migrant populations   

Research

Manbinder is a member of the Qualitative Research Methods for Health Care Evaluation group, University of Birmingham and the British Sociological Association (BSA).

Other activities

Manbinder is a peer reviewer for the International Journal of Qualitative Research

Publications

Sidhu MS, Gill P, Gale N, Marshall T, Jolly K, ‘A systematic review of lay-led group-based self-management interventions for minority-ethnic populations diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in high income countries’. Journal of Health Services Research and Policy (under review)

Conference presentation(s)

Sidhu MS & Gale N, Chronic disease, self-management and systems of support. British Sociological Association Medical Sociology Annual Conference, York, UK, Spetember 2013.

Sidhu MS, Accessing self-care services through formal and informal systems of support. Health Services Research Network Symposium, Nottingham, UK, July 2013. 

Sidhu MS, An analysis of current health beliefs towards chronic disease self-management and behavioural change interventions in a socio-economically deprived multi-ethnic population, 10th Annual Meeting of The Quality Improvement Research Network (QIRN), Karolinska Institutet, Medical Management Centre, Stockholm, Sweden,  June 2012.

Sidhu MS & Duggal S, The methodological implications for South Asian researchers interviewing South Asian participants: A reflexive description, Using sociology to help prevent cardiovascular disease, University of Birmingham (in collaboration with National Institute of Health Research), Birmingham, UK, March 2012. 

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