LLM International and European Legal Responses to Terrorism

Module leader:  Dr Adrian Hunt

Teaching and assessment (2014): Semester 1, Essay - 6,000 words

Module description:

This module explores legal responses to ‘terrorism’ by way of collective action by the ‘International Community’ including, in particular, initiatives and action undertaken by the United Nations, the European Union, and the Council of Europe.

The module covers issues concerned with the legal basis for enabling such action and mechanisms for controlling it. In so doing the module examines issues which collective action by international and regional bodies raises for international law, transnational criminal law, international criminal law, international criminal justice, European Union criminal law and justice, and International and European Human Rights law.

The module is also concerned with:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of various initiatives undertaken by the ‘International Community’ and regional bodies
  • Analysing the impact which these initiatives have: on individuals; and
    on trends in the use of such collective mechanisms for action in the field of criminal law and justice in International and European contexts.

Seminar topics:

  • Overview of International and European Legal frameworks for countering ‘terrorism’
  • ‘Terrorism’ as an ‘international crime’ and ‘terrorism’ as an ‘transnational crime’
  • Approaches to defining ‘terrorism’ in transnational, international, and regional legal instruments and customary international law
  • The role of the UN in countering Terrorism
  • The role of the EU in countering Terrorism
  • Asset-Freezing mechanisms and the conflict between UN, EU, ECHR and domestic legal orders
  • Human rights and counter terrorism
  • Derogating from human rights obligations in order to counter terrorism.
 

Disclaimer

Modules and Courses are constantly updated and under review. As with most academic programmes, please remember that it is possible that a module may not be offered in any particular year, for instance because a member of staff is on study leave or too few students opt for it. The University of Birmingham reserves the right to vary or withdraw any course or module.