Dr Robin Thompson PhD

Senior Birmingham Fellow

School of Psychology

Robin Thompson

Contact details

School of Psychology
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Robin Thompson is a cognitive psychologist interested in the underlying nature of human language (both signed and spoken) and, in particular, how language is related to other aspects of cognition.

Qualifications

BA, Linguistics, California State University of Northridge
MA Linguistics, University of California, San Diego
PhD Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego

Biography

Robin Thompson worked as a sign language interpreter and teacher before receiving her MA in Linguistics and then her PhD in Cognitive Science and Linguistics at University of California, San Diego.

She has worked at The Salk Institute (Laboratory for Cognitive Neuroscience) and at San Diego State University (Laboratory for Language and Cognitive Neuroscience) with Professor Karen Emmorey and at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre at UCL.

Postgraduate supervision

Please email if you are interested in pursuing research (at any level) in multimodal communication, sign language research, linguistics, psycholinguistics or language and cognition.

Research

Scopus ID: 26533479100

Our understanding of language is changing from a view of language as a system separated from other aspects of cognition, to one in which language is understood to be highly integrated with (and dependent on) other cognitive systems. Robin’s research deals with the interaction and dependency of language on different aspects of human cognition, with a particular focus on the relationship between language (both in terms of acquisition and processing) and modality.

Publications

Thompson, R.L., Emmorey, K., Kluender, R & Langdon, C. (in press). The eyes don't point: Understanding language universals through person marking in American Signed Language. Lingua.

Frank, S., Fernandez-Monslave I., Thompson, R.L., Vigliocco, G. (2013).  Reading-time data for evaluating broad-coverage models of English sentence processing. Behavior Research Methods.

Thompson, R.L., Vinson, D.P., Fox, N., Vigliocco, G. (2013). Is Lexical Access Driven by Temporal Order or Perceptual Salience? Evidence from British Sign Language. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.

Thompson, R.L., Vinson, D.P., Woll, B., Vigliocco, G. (2012). The road to language learning is iconic: evidence from British Sign Language. Psychological Science. 23(12): 1443 –1448.

Frank, S., Thompson, R. L. (2012). Early effects of word surprisal on pupil size during reading. In: N. Miyake, D. Peebles, & R.P. Cooper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1554-1559). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Thompson, R. L. (2011). Iconicity in language processing and acquisition: What signed languages reveal. Language and Linguistics Compass. 10(5): 603-616.

*Perniss, P., *Thompson, R.L. & Vigliocco, G. (2010). Iconicity as a general property of language: Evidence from spoken and signed languages. Frontiers in Language Sciences. DOI={10.3389/fpsyg.2010.00227}, *Shared first authorship.

Thompson, R.L., Vinson, D.P, Vigliocco, G. (2010). The link between form and meaning in British Sign Language: Effects of Iconicity for Phonological Decisions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition. 36(4):1017-1027.

Vinson, D.P., Thompson, R.L., Skinner, R., Fox, N., Vigliocco, G. (2010). The hands and mouth do not always slip together in British Sign Language: Dissociating articulatory channels in the lexicon. Psychological Science. 21: 1158-1167.

Thompson, R.L., Emmorey, K., & Kluender, R. (2009). Learning to look: The acquisition of eye gaze agreement during the production of ASL verbs. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. 12(4): 393-409.

Thompson, R.L., Vinson, D., Vigliocco, G. (2009). When Meaning Permeates Form: Effects of Iconicity for Phonological Decisions in British Sign Language. Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Amsterdam: Cognitive Science Society.

Vinson, D.P, Thompson, R.L., Vigliocco, G., Skinner, R., Fox, N. (2009). Errors on hands and mouth in British Sign Language, Dissociating articulatory channels in the lexicon. Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Amsterdam: Cognitive Science Society.

Thompson, R.L., Vinson, D.P, Vigliocco, G. (2009). The link between form and meaning in American Sign Language: Lexical processing effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition. 35(2):550-7.

Emmorey, K., Borinstein, H.B., Thompson, R.L., Gollan, T.H. (2009).  Bimodal bilingualism.  In, Hearing, Mother Father Deaf.   M. Bishop & S. Hicks (Eds). Washington DC: Gallaudet University Press.  

Emmorey, K., Thompson, R.L., Colvin, R. (2008). Eye gaze during comprehension of American Sign Language by native and beginning signers. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 14: 237-243.

Emmorey, K., Borinstein, H.B., Thompson, R.L., & Gollan, T.H. (2008).  Bimodal bilingualism.  Bilingualism:  Language and Cognition, 11 (1), 43–61.

Thompson, R.L., Emmorey, K., & Kluender, R. (2006). The relationship between eye gaze and agreement in American Sign Language: An eye-tracking study. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, 24, 571-604.

Emmorey, K., Borinstein, H.B., & Thompson, R.L. (2005). Bimodal bilingualism: Code-blending between spoken English and American Sign Language, In McAlister, K., Rolstad, K., & MacSwan, J. (Eds.), ISB4: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Bilingualism. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Thompson, R.L., Emmorey, K., & Gollan, T. (2005). Tip-of-the-fingers experiences by ASL signers: Insights into the organization of a sign-based lexicon. Psychological Science, 16(11), 856-860.

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