Dr Kimberly Quinn PhD

Senior Research Fellow in Psychology

School of Psychology

Kimberly Quinn

Contact details

School of Psychology
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Kimberly Quinn is a social-cognitive psychologist with interests in face processing (e.g., social categorisation, emotion recognition), self–other representation (e.g., behavioural synchrony), and moral judgement (e.g., moral certainty).

More information may be found at her personal webpage: http://www.kimberlyquinn.net/.

Qualifications

  • BA (McGill University)
  • MA (Western Ontario)
  • PhD (Western Ontario)

Biography

Dr Quinn hails from small-town Canada. She completed her undergraduate degree at McGill University and her postgraduate degrees at the University of Western Ontario, followed by postdoctoral training at Northwestern University and Dartmouth College. She has been at the University of Birmingham since July 2004.

Research

Research group

Dr Quinn is an experimental social psychologist with a wide range of research interests. Currently, her research emphasizes three topics: face processing and social categorisation; behavioural synchrony and self–other representation; moral judgement.

Research funding

Dr Quinn's research is currently funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Leverhulme Trust.

  • 2012–2015: Toward a Theoretical Model of Behavioural Synchrony. Standard Grant, Economic and Social Research Council (Amount: £478,137) (Principal Investigator, with J. T. Cacioppo, University of Chicago).
  • 2012–2014: Witnessing Virtue versus Vice: Comparing Moral Condemnation and Moral Praise. Research Project Grant, Leverhulme Trust (Amount: £78,297).

Other activities

Publications

Gawronski, B., & Quinn, K. A. (2013). Guilty by mere similarity: Assimilative effects of facial resemblance on automatic evaluation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 120–125.

Quinn, K. A., & Rosenthal, H. E. S. (2012). Categorizing others and the self: How social memory structures guide social cognition and behavior. Learning and Motivation, 43, 247–258. (Invited contribution to special issue: “Remembering the future”.)

Quinn, K. A., & Macrae, C. N. (2011). The face and person perception: Insights from social cognition. British Journal of Psychology, 102, 849–867. (Invited contribution to special issue: “Person perception 25 years after Bruce and Young (1986)”.)

Cassidy, K. D., Quinn, K. A., & Humphreys, G. W. (2011). The influence of ingroup/outgroup categorization on same- and other-race face processing: The moderating role of inter- versus intra-racial context. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 811–817.

Hodsoll, J., Quinn, K. A., & Hodsoll, S. (2010). Attentional prioritization of infant faces is limited to own-race infants. PLoS ONE, 5(9): e12509. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0012509.

Quinn, K. A., Mason, M. F., & Macrae, C. N. (2010). When Arnold is “The Terminator,” we no longer see him as a man: The temporal determinants of person perception. Experimental Psychology, 57, 27-35.

Quinn, K. A., Mason, M. F., & Macrae, C. N. (2009). Familiarity and person construal: Individual knowledge moderates the automaticity of category activation. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39, 852-861.

Macrae, C. N., Quinn, K. A., Mason, M. F., & Quadflieg, S. (2005). Understanding others: The face and person construal. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 686-695.

Quinn, K. A., & Macrae, C. N. (2005). Categorizing others: The dynamics of person construal. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 467-479.

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