Biblical Texts and Reception History: retrospect and prospects

Locations
ERI Building (G3 on the campus map)
Category
Arts and Law, Research, Students, Teaching
Date(s)
Wednesday 6th June 2012 (10:00-15:30)
Contact

This conference is FREE, but pre-registration is required, for logistical purposes.

Please contact Georgia Michaels  or Edgar Ebojo

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Description

The University of Birmingham, in conjunction with the Department of Theology and Religion, is pleased to announce the Second University of Birmingham Biblical Studies Day Conference, open to all Postgraduate Researchers of the University of Birmingham and other Universities.

A number of new perspectives about biblical manuscripts have come to light in the last 100 years, and this development has presented new challenges and opportunities that need to be reflected upon, especially by those in the academe. This conference aims to highlight previous researches and recent developments in the area of the studies of these biblical texts and to explore how these texts have been construed throughout the centuries, and how these affect, if they do, future studies and reception of the same.

To set the parameters for discussion, we have invited two guest speakers to share their own professional journeys insofar as the biblical texts are concerned: Prof Larry Hurtado, Emeritus Professor of New Testament Language, Literature, and Theology, University of Edinburgh, and, Dr Simon Crisp, Coordinator for Translation Standards and Scholarly Editions, United Bible Societies (UBS).

Short papers of twenty five minutes from postgraduate researchers in the UK are very much welcome, especially in the areas of (but not limited to):

  • Early and Later Reception of the Biblical Texts (OT/Hebrew Bible and NT)
  • Interpretation of Biblical Texts in Early Christianity, and in other religions
  • Circulation of Christian and Biblical Texts and/or their manuscripts
  • Recent Developments in the Study of OT/Hebrew Bibles and New Testament
  • Texts and Versions
  • Biblical and Christian Texts in light of Modern Interpretive Models (e.g., Feminist, Pentecostal, Cultural Studies, etc.)
  • Scriptural Exegesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocrypha & Pseudepigrapha
  • Pseudepigrapha and Early Christian Interpretation of Scripture

Abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to Edgar Ebojo on or before 1 April 2012. Successful proposals will be notified accordingly.