Research in the School of Social Policy

Within the School of Social Policy, we undertake innovative, exciting, applied research. We believe in research making impact and we aim to build into the research process itself, communities, policy makers and practitioners, so as to ensure that our research travels and impacts upon people's everyday lives. Our research is ethically driven and sensitive, and deeply resonates with local, national and international issues..

A series of broad research themes underpin the research activities of the School. These are:

Research expertise across the School currently sits within our Departments. The Health Services Management Centre organises its research around its five areas of work or specialisms:

In addition, there is an over-arching Participatory Research theme, which is cross-cutting across the School's research activities.

Research Centres

Research Groups

View all Health Services Management Centre (HSMC) research projects

View all Department of Social Policy and Social Work (SPSW) projects

Doctoral Training Centre status

The University of Birmingham has been selected as one of only 12 single institutions to receive 'Doctoral Training Centre' status from the ESRC. The award recognises the work of social science colleagues over the past two years in consolidating our research training programmes into the new MA Social Research, as well as the commitment to high quality doctoral supervision and the wider experience for doctoral researchers at Birmingham.

Professor Pete Alcock, Director, Doctoral Training Centre

ESRC Doctoral Training Centre

Research news

Posted 19 July 2016

Good Housing: Better Health

Against a backdrop of the ongoing consultation on the design of the new Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme, The Academic-Practitioner Partnership has published a paper to highlight the one-sided approach to housing policy.

Posted 13 July 2016

CHASM Annual Conference Report, 2016

On 15 June 2016, CHASM members were joined by around 50 delegates for their annual conference held this year in London. The theme of this year's event was 'Debt into Saving', which formed the basis of two lively panel sessions.