Matthew Gibson

PQ Teaching Fellow

Contact details

School of Social Policy, IASS
Muirhead Tower
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT, United Kingdom

About

Matthew is a registered social worker and teaches on the post-qualifying social work programmes specialising in social work with children, young people, their families and carers. He has worked as a child care social worker in a number of local authorities in England, Brunei, and New Zealand. He has a strong interest in improving social work practice.

Matthew can be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Qualifications

  • PG Dip in Specialist Social Work with Children, Young People, their Families and Carers, University of Birmingham (2009)
  • PG Cert in Emotional Education, University of Derby (2006)
  • MA in Social Work, University of Birmingham (2005)
  • DipSW, University of Birmingham (2005)
  • BSc (Hons) in Medical Microbiology, University of Leeds (2000)

Biography

Matthew is a registered social worker and teaches on the postqualifying social work programmes specialising in social work with children, young people, their families and carers. He has worked as a social worker in a number of local authorities in England, specialising in child protection work. He has also gained international social work experience having worked as a social worker in Brunei and New Zealand.

He has a strong interest in social work practice and what improves this for practitioners on the front line. He has interests in strengths based, solution focused approaches and has trained in the Signs of Safety approach and used it extensively in his practice as a social worker. He also has an interest in narrative practice and family group decision making and their use in facilitating change with children and families.

He has worked as a consultant social worker, trainer and practice educator and has delivered training in safeguarding children as well as the Signs of Safety approach to social workers and managers. He has also designed and delivered emotional education courses to multi-professional audiences, focusing on the emotional aspects of learning and performance and is interested in its application to social work practice and education.

Teaching

  • Specialist Award in Social Work with Children, Young People, their Families and Carers
  • BA Social Policy, Pathways module

Research

PhD Thesis: Shame in social work practitioners

Other activities

Gibson, M (2013), 'Shame and Guilt in Child Protection Social Work: New Interpretations and Opportunities for Practice', in 13th International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) European Regional Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect.

Gibson, M (2013), 'Using Narrative Practice to develop struggling students'. In NOPT Conference 2013. Oxford: Ruskin College.

Gibson, M (2012), 'The 'Sexual Abuse Case' Survival Guide: Tools for working with families where there has been sexual abuse'. In Practitioner Conference: Contemporary Risk Assessment and the Signs of Safety Approach, Birmingham, 8 May 2012. Birmingham: University of Birmingham. pp.1 (Conference Publications; 1).

Gibson, M (2012), 'Meaningful partnership: Re-imagining how social work can facilitate sustained change to provide safety in families where there are risks of sexual abuse.' In British Association for the Study and Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (BASPCAN) 8th Congress: Keeping Children Safe in an Uncertain World: Learning from Evidence and Practice, Belfast, 15-18 April 2012. York: BASPCAN. pp.125 (Conference Publications; 8).

Publications

Gibson, M (in press), Narrative practice and the signs of safety approach: Engaging adolescents in building rigorous safety plans. Child Care in Practice, 19(3).

Gibson, M (2013), Shame and Guilt in Child Protection Social Work: New interpretations and opportunities for practice. Child and Family Social Work, 'Online First' published 4 July 2013 (Available from: DOI: 10.1111/cfs.12081).

Gibson, M (2012), Narrative Practice and Social Work Education: Using a narrative approach in social work practice education to develop struggling social work students. Practice, 24(1): 1-13.

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