Elliott Newell

 

Doctoral Researcher

School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences

Contact details

School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

PhD Title: The use of imagery to manage competitive emotion

Supervisors: Dr Jennifer Cumming and Dr Robert Gray

Elliott is a part-time PhD student at the University of Birmingham researching the use of imagery by athletes in managing competitive emotions. Elliott is a lecturer in sport psychology at Loughborough College, Leicestershire.

Qualifications

  • BASES Accredited Sport and Exercise Scientist (Scientific Support – Psychology) – BASES (2011)
  • MSc Sport and Exercise Science (Sport Psychology Pathway) – Manchester Metropolitan University (2007)
  • BSc P.E./Sport Science with Psychology – University College Chester (2006)

Biography

Elliott Newell studied sport science and psychology at University College Chester before completing a Masters at Manchester Metropolitan University. He now lectures on undergraduate degree programs in Sport at Loughborough College. Elliott is a BASES Accredited Sport and Exercise Scientist (Scientific Support – Psychology) and works as a sport psychology consultant for a number of national governing bodies, sports clubs and individual athletes.

Research

  • The Psychology of Performance in Sport 
  • Imagery Use by Athletes 
  • Psychologies Strategies use by Athletes to Manage Competitive Emotion

Other activities

Elliott is an active member of the Birmingham Research in Imagery and Observation Group (BRIO) and the University of Birmingham’s Sport Psychology Journal Club.

Publications

Conference Presentations

Newell, E.  & Coyle, M. (2011). The relationship between image type and perceived effectiveness in high-confident student-athletes. Poster presented at the BASES Annual Conference 2011, University of Essex, Essex, UK.

Newell, E. & Coyle, M. (2011). The influence of anxiety and confidence traits on imagery content and perceived functions of imagery. Poster presented at the 16th Annual Congress of the ECSS 2011, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK

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