Dr Callum Osler

 

Doctoral Researcher

osler-callum

Contact details

School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Callum is a postdoctoral research associate working with Dr Raymond Reynolds at the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences. He is currently conducting a BBSRC funded research project to investigate the effect of ageing on the control of balance.

Qualifications

BSc (2008), PhD (2012), University of Birmingham

Biography

After gaining an undergraduate degree in Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Birmingham, Callum stayed on to complete his PhD under the supervision of Dr Raymond Reynolds and Dr Martin Lakie. His thesis studied whether the processing of vestibular signals for balance and orientation is modulated by changes to the postural, sensory and emotional context. He was recently appointed as a postdoctoral researcher and is now investigating whether the vestibular control of balance is affected by ageing. This research project is funded by the BBSRC.

Research

Dr Osler’s principal research interests lie within the field of human postural control. His work has predominantly used mastoid electrical stimulation to investigate vestibular-evoked balance and orientation reflexes, most recently in elderly individuals. He also has experience with rotary chair testing and caloric vestibular stimulation. Besides studying the vestibular system, Callum has conducted research examining the effect of light touch and interpersonal contact on the control of balance.

Other activities

  • Affiliate of the Physiological Society
  • Associate of the Higher Education Academy

Publications

Osler CJ and Reynolds RF (2012). Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation. Experimental Brain Research, 223, 189-197.
Reynolds RF and Osler CJ (2012). Galvanic vestibular stimulation produces sensations of rotation consistent with activation of semicircular canal afferents. Frontiers in Neurology, 3, 104.
Osler CJ and Reynolds RF (2012). Postural reorientation does not cause the locomotor after-effect following rotary locomotion. Experimental Brain Research, 220, 231-237.

Conference Presentations:

Osler CJ and Reynolds RF (2012). Sensory feedback during interpersonal light fingertip contact stabilises human balance. Proceedings of the Physiological Society, 27, PC256. (Poster Communication)
Osler CJ and Reynolds RF (2011). Vestibular signals for orientation during self-generated head motion. Abstracts of the 6th International Posture Symposium, 69. (Oral Communication)
Osler CJ and Reynolds RF (2010). Static postural after-effect of stepping on a rotating treadmill. Proceedings of the Physiological Society, 19, PC228. (Poster Communication)
Osler CJ, Lakie M and Reynolds RF (2009). The effect of actual and expected light touch contact on the response to galvanic vestibular stimulation. Proceedings of the Physiological Society, 17, C19. (Oral Communication)

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