Dr Giovanna d’Adda

 

Lecturer in Economics

Department of Economics

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Contact details

University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Giovanna d’Adda is a development and behavioral economist whose research focuses on the analysis of how formal and informal institutions can foster pro-social behavior, measured using original survey and experimental data. She received her PhD from Bocconi University before becoming lecturer at the University of Birmingham in 2012.

Qualifications

  • PhD in Economics, Bocconi University, 2012
  • MSc in Development Management, LSE, 2004
  • BSc in Economic and Social Sciences, Bocconi University, 2003

Biography

Giovanna d’Adda is an applied microeconomist, investigating behavioural issues in developing country settings. Three main areas of her research are centered around the following questions. First, how can we foster contributions to local public goods using informal institutions? Second, what factors determine leaderhip effectiveness in different contexts? Third, what is the role of formal institutions in building societal trust and norms of behavior? In order to address these questions, she conducts laboratory experiments in the field, and combines them with more traditional sources of empirical data.

She conducted fieldwork in Kenya, Bolivia, Colombia and Sierra Leone. During her graduate studies, she was  visiting researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School, Paris School of Economics and University of Zurich. Her PhD supervisor was Professor Eliana La Ferrara.

Teaching

Development Economics (part II)

Research

Development Economics, Behavioural Economics, Experimental Economics

Other activities

Programme Director BSc Economics / Open Day talks

Publications

d’Adda, G. , (2011), ‘Social Norms and Motivation Crowding in Environmental Conservation: Evidence from an Artefactual Field Experiment’, Ecological Economics, 70: 2083–2097

d’Adda, G. , M. Goldstein, J. Graff Zivin, M. Nangami and H. Thirumurthy, (2009), ‘ARV Treatment and Time Allocation to Household Tasks: Evidence from Kenya’, African Development Review, 21: 180-208 

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