Dr Cara Bailey PhD, RGN, MN

 

Lecturer

Nursing

Contact details

Nursing
School of Health and Population Sciences
Medical School Building
College of Medical and Dental Sciences
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Cara Bailey is a lecturer in nursing in the College of Medical and Dental Sciences. 

Cara’s research maintains a broad interest in the care of people at the end of their lives beyond cancer in palliative and end of life studies and for those who work closely with the dying, the bereaved and the critically ill. She is primarily involved in research activity exploring patient experiences of end of life care in the ED and the design of interventions to improve supportive and palliative care from the emergency admission. Given the educational impact of this work, she also has an interest in the educational support to undergraduate students and trained nurses in relation to managing emotional labour when caring for the critically ill, dying and bereaved.

Cara’s research has received international interest and she frequently presents work about end-of-life care in the ED at both local and national level.  She contributes to both the local and national media.

Qualifications

  • PhD (University of Nottingham)
  • MN (University of Nottingham)
  • RGN (University of Nottingham)

Biography

Cara entered the nursing profession in 1999 and has a background in emergency care. She qualified with a Masters Degree in Nursing in 2003 from The University of Nottingham, England and moved to Southampton to work in the Emergency Department. She returned to The University of Nottingham in 2005 and was awarded a PhD in 2009. The focus of the Doctorate was end of life care in the Emergency Department. 

Cara’s involvement in module co-ordination, teaching, learning and supervision encompasses the subject areas of biological sciences, research methods, critical care and end of life care in addition to mandatory clinical sessions such as basic life support. 

Cara maintains her clinical practice working in emergency care across the East and West Midlands and has links with students and mentors in practice at Heartlands Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham Trust. 

Cara’s research maintains a broad interest in the care of people at the end of their lives beyond cancer in palliative and end of life studies and for those who work closely with the dying, the bereaved and the critically ill. She is primarily involved in research activity exploring patient experiences of end of life care in the ED. Given the educational impact of this work, she also has an interest in the educational support to undergraduate students and trained nurses in relation to managing emotional labour when caring for the critically ill, dying and bereaved.  

Teaching

Teaching Programmes

Cara’s involvement in module co-ordination, teaching, learning and supervision encompasses the subject areas of acute care, critical care and end-of-life care in addition to research methods and biological sciences. She also co-ordinates clinical sessions such as basic life support.

Postgraduate supervision

Cara is interested in supervising doctoral research students in the following areas:

  • End of life care
  • Nurse – patient relationship

If you are interesting in studying any of these subject areas please contact Cara on the contact deatils above, or for any general doctoral research enquiries, please email: dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk or call +44 (0)121 414 5005.

For a full list of available Doctoral Research opportunities, please visit our Doctoral Research programme listings.   

Research

RESEARCH THEMES

Cancer and Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Qualitative research, End of life care. 

RESEARCH ACTIVITY

SPEED Study (Supportive and Palliative care at the End of life in the Emergency Department).

The SPEED study aims: to identify a suitable intervention to improve end-of-life care provision in the ED by (1) collating information about current service provision in England; (2) identifying effective intervention(s), acceptable to patients/service providers, reduces the time taken to meet end-of-life care needs of patients direct from emergency admission; (3) designing a future trial to determine the outcomes of the preferred intervention being implemented in EDs nationally.

The research will provide a much needed evidence base about the use of supportive and palliative care interventions used in EDs nationally. It will produce a feasible, and practicable intervention that can be implemented into EDs to improve end-of-life care for patients from emergency admission. This will have major implications for policy in relation to achieving high quality of care for all patients at the end-of-life considering the previously neglected field of emergency care. It will have a significant impact on practice in regards to improving patient experience and developing systems for emergency staff caring for patients at the end-of-life. 

EURECA Study (Exploring, understanding and reducing emergency cancer admissions).

This study aims to understand patients‟ experiences of the time leading to admission, the admission process itself and their experiences in the immediate period following admission, by addressing the following areas:

1) To understand the mechanisms, processes and contexts which lead to emergency admission for patients with lung cancer and a comparative group of patients with COPD.

2) To understand the experiences of patients following admission and the benefits or problems associated with hospital stay following emergency admission.

Through the insights gained we intend:

3) To develop a qualitative risk stratification framework of the conditions and contexts influencing the likelihood of patients having an emergency admission.

4) a. To propose models of community cancer, COPD and end of life care which aim to reduce the likelihood of such admissions occurring and

b. to develop models aimed at improving the experience of admission

Other activities

  • Reviewer: Journal of Advanced Nursing
  • Member: End-of-life care research programme
  • Committee member for End-of-life care curriculum planning
  • Steering group member: Making sense of death and dying

Publications

Bailey, C.J., Murphy, R., Porock, D. (In press) Dying cases in emergency places: Caring for the dying in Emergency Departments. Social Science & Medicine.

Bailey, C.J., Murphy, R., Porock, D. (In press) Professional Tears: Developing emotional intelligence around death and dying in emergency work. Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Bailey, C.J. (In Press) Essays on the end of life. Nursing the dying in the Emergency Department: the importance of therapeutic intimacy.

Bailey, C.J., Murphy, R., Porock, D. (2011) Trajectories of end-of-life care in the Emergency Department. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 57, pp. 362-369

Bailey, C.J. (2010) The Spectacular Finale: end-of-life care in the Emergency Department.  Making sense of death and dying. Care, Dying and the End of Life [online] Available from: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net

Bailey, C.J. (2007) When End of Life becomes an Emergency: Dealing with Death and Dying in the Emergency Department. Making Sense of Dying and Death [Online] Available from: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/mso/dd/dd5/s6a.html

Bailey, C.J. (2007) Practitioner to Researcher: Reflections of the Journey. Nurse Researcher: 14(4): 18-26

Expertise

End-of-life care, particularly improving care at the end-of-life in the Emergency Department; preparing nurses to manage the emotional aspects of caring for the dying

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