Dr Michael W. O'Reilly MB PhD MRCPI

Dr Michael W. O'Reilly

Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research
Clinician Scientist in Endocrinology

Contact details

Michael is currently preparing a preliminary Wellcome postdoctoral fellowship proposal in which he proposes to examine the impact of androgen deficiency and androgen replacement on the human metabolome using a non-targeted approach.

Qualifications

  • PhD (2015)
  • CCT in Endocrinology/Diabetes/GIM (2014)
  • Member of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland 2007
  • Bachelor of Medicine (Honours) National University of Ireland Galway 2005

Biography

Career history:

August 2015: Clinician Scientist and Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist,                                                                                 University of Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham

2012-2015: PhD student and Wellcome Clinical Research Fellow, UOB

2011-2012: Clinical Research Fellow (UOB, RCPI research bursary)

2008-11: Specialist training Endocrinology/Diabetes/General Medicine

2005-08: Foundation and Core Medical Training, Rep. of Ireland

1999-2005: Medical degree, National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG)

Teaching

  • Adrenal lecturer to 1st year MB ChB
  • Small Group tutorials 1st and 2nd year MB ChB
  • Senior Medical Examiner Final Medical exams

Postgraduate supervision

Membership candidate tutorials MRCP(UK)

Research

Research summary

Over the last three years, my PhD thesis, supervised by Wiebke Arlt and Jeremy Tomlinson, has focused on the links between insulin resistance and androgen excess in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). I focused on adipose tissue as an intracrine organ of androgen generation. Data from this exploratory work has led to identification of AKR1C3 as an important androgen-activating enzyme, and a potential therapeutic target in PCOS. I am currently preparing a preliminary Wellcome postdoctoral fellowship proposal in which I propose to examine the impact of androgen deficiency and androgen replacement on the human metabolome using a non-targeted approach. I hope that this strategy may also be extended to identify novel metabolomic markers of androgen abuse in sport.

Grants awarded

  • Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Training Fellowship 2012 (£320,000)
  • Royal College of Physicians of Ireland Research Bursary 2011 (€50,000)

Group members Arlt group

Major collaborators

Dr. Warwick Dunn, Birmingham; Dr. Robert Semple, Cambridge; Prof Jeremy Tomlinson, Oxford.

Other activities

  1. Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist University Hospitals Birmingham.

Publications

Selected recent publications:

O’Reilly MW, House PJ, Tomlinson JW. Understanding androgen action in adipose tissue. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2014 Sep; 143: 277-84

O’Reilly MW, Taylor AE, Crabtree NJ, Hughes BA, Capper F, Crowley        RK, Stewart PM, Tomlinson JW, Arlt W. Hyperandrogenemia predicts metabolic phenotype in PCOS: the utility of serum androstenedione. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2014 March; 99 (3): 1027-1036.

O’Reilly MW, Sexton DJ, Dennedy MC, Counihan TJ, Finucane FM,            O’Brien TJ, O’Regan AW. Radiologic remission and recovery of thirst appreciation after adipsic diabetes secondary to neurosarcoidosis. QJM 2015 Aug; 108 (8): 657-9

O’Reilly MW, Avalos G, Dennedy MC, O’Sullivan EP, Dunne F. Atlantic DIP: High prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance postpartum is reduced by breast-feeding in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus. Eur J Endocrinol 2011 Dec; 165 (6): 953-9

Oostdijk W, Idkowiak J, Mueller JW, House PJ, Taylor Ae, O’Reilly MW, Hughes BA, de Vries MC, Kant SG, Santen GW, Verkerk AJ, Uitterlinden AG, Wit JM, Losekoot M, Arlt W. PAPSS2 deficiency causes androgen excess via impaired DHEA sulfation – in vitro and in vivo studies in a family harbouring novel PAPSS2 mutation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2015 Apr; 100 (4):277-8