Dr Mark Walker BA, PhD (Cantab)

 

Lecturer in Philosophy

Department of Philosophy

Photograph of Dr Mark Walker

Contact details

ERI Building
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

Biography

I received my PhD in Philosophy from the University of Cambridge in 1990, and have been a permanent lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham since 1991. 

Teaching

I have taught undergraduate modules on moral philosophy, Schopenhauer and Spinoza every year since my appointment at Birmingham, as well as (less frequently) modules on Berkeley and Nietzsche.

Postgraduate supervision

The topics of my postgraduate research students have included Schopenhauer and the novels of Conrad, Nietzsche’s conception of the Superman, the objectivity of aesthetics, rationality and self-deception, egoism and altruism, and the nature of moral concepts.  

Research

My principal research interests are the philosophy of mind (particularly the theory of action and the nature of rational deliberation); metaphysics (esp. the issues of universals, free will, and personal identity); Kant’s moral philosophy; the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Spinoza; and some areas in the philosophy of religion (esp. divine command theories of morality).

Publications

  • ‘The Real Reason Why the Prisoner’s Dilemma is not a Newcomb Problem’, forthcoming inPhilosophia (accepted January 6th, 2014).
  • Kant, Schopenhauer and Morality - Recovering the Categorical Imperative, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. , Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
  • `The Freedom of Judgment', International Journal of Philosophical Studies Vol.11,no.1, March 2003.
  • `A Problem for Causal Theories of Action' Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, 2002.
  • `Against One Form of Judgment Determinism', International Journal of Philosophical Studies, May 2001, Vol.9(2), pp. 199-227.
  • 'Williams, Truth-Aimedness and the Voluntariness of Judgement', Ratio, March 2001, Vol. XIV, No.1, pp.68-83.
  • 'The Voluntariness of Judgement: Reply to Stein', Inquiry 41, September 1998.

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