Dr Richard Bennett BSc (Hons), DipCOT, ClinPsyD, CPsycol, CSci, AFBPsS

Dr Richard Bennett

School of Psychology
Lecturer in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Course Lead - PGDip High Intensity Psychological Therapy (CBT)

Contact details

Address
School of Psychology
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

Dr Richard Bennett works as a Lecturer on the CBT programmes, where he leads the Postgraduate Diploma in High Intensity CBT.  He has been in this post since 2010.  Richard worked for over 20 years in the National Health Service, developing expertise in a range of cognitive behavioural psychotherapies, including Cognitive Therapy, Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT), and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).  He now conducts his clinical work in independent practice as Director of Think Psychology.  He is an active member of the Association for Contextual Behavioural Sciences (ACBS) and the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).  Richard has extensive experience of supervision and training.  He has trained and supervised a wide range of healthcare professionals across the UK, as well as internationally.  He is recognised as an ACBS Peer-Reviewed ACT Trainer and as a BABCP accredited Psychotherapist, Supervisor, and Trainer.

Qualifications

  • BSc Psychology, The University of Plymouth
  • Diploma in Occupational Therapy, Essex School of Occupational Therapy
  • Clinical Psychology Doctorate, The University of Birmingham

Biography

I have worked in the NHS for approximately 20 years, primarily in adult mental health and forensic mental health.  My clinical work has specialized in providing Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) and CBT to service users with a variety of clinical presentations, in addition to extensive experience in the provision of teaching, training and supervision. He is accredited as a CBT therapist with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) and certified as a supervisor in REBT and CBT by the Albert Ellis Institute in New York.

Teaching

As Course Lead for the Diploma in High Intensity Psychological Therapies, I co-ordinate the course as well as planning and providing much of the teaching.  I also contribute to teaching on other CBT courses, as well as the Clinical Psychology Doctorate and the Msc in Forensic Mental Health.

Postgraduate supervision

I currently supervises clinically relevant research, such as that carried out by students on the Clinical Psychology Doctorate or the MSc CBT programmes, although I am not available to take on additional PhD supervision.

Doctoral research

PhD title Is alexithymia associated with a perceptual sensitivity to affective stimuli?

Research

I have conducted research relating to emotional processing, violent fantasy, and care pathways in forensic services.

Other activities

  • I am actively involved in running The Centre for REBT at The University of Birmingham, which is the UK affiliate of the Albert Ellis Institute in New York.  The Centre provides training and supervision in REBT for therapists, as well as promoting research in the area.
  • I also work independently as an expert witness, providing psychological assessments and reports for the court in both criminal and civil proceedings, as well as providing Parole Board reports for life sentenced prisoners.

Publications

Bennett, R. (2008). Implementing a single team model of care on a medium secure intensive care unit: an evaluation of a six-month pilot project (5th National Conference of Research in Medium Secure Units 2008, oral presentation).

Bennett, R., Ramakrishna, V. & Maganty, D. (2009). Management of disturbed behaviour/violence in a medium secure intensive care unit: views of staff on the choice of intervention (Royal College of Psychiatrists Conference 2009, poster presentation).

Bennett, R., Ramakrishna, V. & Maganty, D. (2010). Management of disturbed behaviour in a medium secure intensive care unit: views of staff on options for intervention.  Journal of Psychiatric Intensive Care, 7(2), 85-89