Jess Kerlin

 

Research Associate
Doctoral Researcher

School of Psychology

Jess Kerlin

Contact details

School of Psychology
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Jess Kerlin is currently studying visual attention and working memory, with the goal of uncovering the neural mechanisms which underlie these processes. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Psychology under the supervision of Professor Kimron Shapiro and Professor Jane Raymond, utilizing a number of behavioural and neuroimaging techniques to address critical questions in the field.

Qualifications

BA in Psychobiology, University of California, Santa Cruz

Biography

Since graduating from UC Santa Cruz, Jess worked as a research associate with Professor Frank Tong at Princeton and Vanderbilt and with Professor Lee Miller at UC Davis. He served on a number of fMRI and EEG neuroimaging projects on visual and auditory perception.

He has also previously trained as an emergency medical technician, served as an English teacher in Hanoi, and worked as a process engineer for the startup PlanarMag in Sacramento, California.

Research

Research interests

  • Visual Perception and Visual Working Memory
  • Neural Oscillations
  • Reward and dopaminergic learning

Publications

Shahin, A.J., Kerlin, J.R., Bhat, J., Miller, L.M. Neural restoration of degraded audiovisual speech. NeuroImage 2012 60(1):530-8

Campbell, T., Kerlin, J.R., Bishop, C.W. & Miller L.M. Methods to Eliminate Stimulus Transduction Artifact From Insert Earphones During Electroencephalography. Ear & Hearing 2012 33(1):144-50

Kerlin, J.R., Shahin, A.J. & Miller, L.M. Attentional Gain Control of Ongoing Cortical Speech Representations in a “Cocktail Party.” Journal of Neuroscience 2011 30(2):620-8

Seymour, T. L. & Kerlin, J.R. Successful detection of verbal and visual concealed knowledge using an RT based paradigm. Applied Cognitive Psychology 2007 22(4):475-90

Awater, H., Kerlin, J.R., Evans, K. & Tong, F. Cortical representation of space around the blind spot. Journal of Neurophysiology 2005 94(5):3314-24

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