Dr Joanna Long BSc, PhD

 

Research Fellow in Stress and Immune Ageing

School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences

Dr Joanna Long

Contact details

School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

About

Dr Joanna Long is a post doctoral research fellow working with Dr Anna Phillips in the School of Sport and Exercises.

Qualifications

BSc, Ph.D. University of Birmingham

Biography

Joanna completed her undergraduate degree and PhD at the School of Sport and Exercises. Her PhD thesis examined psychosocial factors, physical activity and antibody response to vaccination in healthy and HIV positive populations.

She was appointed as a post doctoral research fellow in the School in 2011 and is currently investigating whether the time of vaccination can affect antibody response to the annual influenza vaccination in older adults. This research is funded by the Medical Research Council as part of the Lifelong Heath and Wellbeing initiative.

Publications

Long JE, Ring C, Drayson MT, Bosch JA, Eves F, Allen D, Calver R, Say V, Burns VE. A lifestyle physical activity intervention and the antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination in women, in preparation.

Long JE, Ring C, Drayson M, Bosch J, Campbell JP, Bhabra J, Browne D, Dawson J, Harding S, Lau J, Burns VE. (2012) Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations? Brain Behavior and Immunity 26(4), 680-687.

Edwards KM, Campbell JP, Ring C, Drayson MT, Bosch JA, Downes C, Long JE, Lumb JA, Merry A, Paine NJ, Burns VE. (2010) Exercise intensity does not influence the efficacy of eccentric exercise as a behavioural adjuvant to vaccination. Brain Behavior and Immunity 24(4), 623-630.

Campbell JP, Edwards KM, Ring C, Drayson MT, Bosch JA, Inskip A, Long JE, Pulsford D, Burns VE. (2010) The effects of vaccine timing on the efficacy of an acute eccentric exercise intervention on the immune response to an influenza vaccine in young adults. Brain Behavior and Immunity 24(2), 236-242.

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