Year one modules

Compulsory modules:

English Language: Sounds, Structures, and Words

(20 credits)

The emphasis in this module is on one of the two key approaches to understanding the English language. This concerns the concepts and technical terminology used to describe the characteristics of the language. This descriptive strand provides a grounding in the phonology, morphology, grammar and lexis of English.

Theories of Language 

(20 credits) 

The aims of this module are to provide first year undergraduate students of English Language with (a) a sound basic knowledge and understanding of the major theories of language that have been developed within the discipline of linguistics from the beginning of the 20th century up to the present day and (b) a sound basic awareness of the key figures associated with each of these theoretical traditions. The module begins with an overview of the basic concepts of structuralist linguistics as laid down by Saussure, before moving on to consider the generativist approach established by Chomsky. We then focus on the two main alternatives to (and critiques of) generative linguistics: functionalism, particularly in the British tradition established by Firth (e.g. Halliday, Sinclair, Hoey) and the usage-based theories associated with cognitive linguistics (e.g. Langacker, Fillmore, Lakoff, Tomasello). Throughout the module students will be encouraged to think critically about each theoretical tradition and to consider which of the linguistic theories they are introduced to they find the most compelling and/or useful.

Practice of Writing 

(20 credits)

This module improves understanding of the language used in different genres and styles and provides insight into the practical issues facing anyone who tries to edit, improve or correct the writing of others. 

Applied Linguistics

(20 credits)

In this module students will consider the ways in which linguistic ideas, insights and methods can be applied in fields such as teaching, translation, social research and forensic science. The topics covered directly feed into many of the modules that students can choose to study in the second and third years of the programme.  

Investigating Language 

(20 credits)

This module is designed to develop students' understanding of key issues in research into the English language, with emphasis on the methodologies and objectives of language-studies research. It will begin to develop their skills in conducting and writing up their own research projects. Students will undertake small-scale research projects in which they will collect data and analyse it, according to descriptive frameworks that they are studying in this and the companion modules.

Widening Horizons Module 

(20 credits)

Students will study one module from a wide range of outside topics offered by other departments across the University.