Italian

Module information for incoming Erasmus and Exchange students interested in modules in Italian Studies.

There are different modules available, depending on whether students are coming from Italy or from other European Union countries.  Junior Year Abroad students will normally have the same options as non-Italian ERASMUS/SOCRATES students. It is important to note that while students may express their preferences, this list does not guarantee acceptance on to any particular module. Most non-language courses will require a knowledge of Italian. Not all courses run every year.

When modules are linked, students on year-long placement will normally be expected to register for both modules.

Courses available for First Year Non-Italian Erasmus and Exchange Students

  • Beginners Italian

Course Code : ITAL M101 ( 09 08699/ 09 08700)

Credits: 40 (20 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Course Outline: The purpose of the course is to enable students with no previous knowledge of Italian to reach a level of intermediate proficiency by the end of the year. Through intensive classroom teaching, and with the help of regular written work, the course builds up students' knowledge of Italian from the rudiments studied in the first few weeks to the acquisition of a vocabulary of several thousand words and competence in sophisticated grammatical areas. These include the expression of opinions using the subjunctive, use of the correct sequence of tenses, grammatically accurate reporting of speech, the recognition of the passato remoto , and an understanding of the passive construction in Italian. The oral part of the course concentrates on communication and on learning how to use the most appropriate language in particular situations Course materials The course will be based on K.Katerinov, M.C. Boriosi Katerinov, Bravissimo! , Milan, Edizioni Scolastiche Bruno Mondadori, 1999 (copies of this book are available for purchase through the Department at an advantageous price) and on C. Boscolo, Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005. Supplementary material will be provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 5 hours language classes in each semester. In addition, students should expect to spend another seven hours a week in private study; the language laboratories and computer clusters will be available for use during private study time.

Assessment: A one-hour written test, to be held in December, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark An aural test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark An oral examination held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark A two-hour written examination in May/June, counting 40% towards the linked modules mark. 

  • Advanced Italian

Course Code : ITAL M102 ( 09 08695/09 08696)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Course Outline: The aim of the course is to enable students, who have an A-level or equivalent proficiency in Italian, to enhance their reading and oral skills and develop their ability to write fluently in Italian. The course will be conducted through class work and home assignments, with regular written work. It will develop students' skills in translation and sum mary work, both into and from Italian and also work on oral proficiency, encouraging effective acquisition of vocabulary and structures. Classes will be conducted in Italian as far as possible, though some explanations may, when necessary, be given in English. Students will be expected and encouraged to use Italian as their means of communication in class.

Course materials: The course will be based on F. Italiano and I. Marchegiani-Jones, Crescendo , D.C. Heath, 1995 and on C. Boscolo, Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005 Supplementary material will be provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 4 hours language classes in each semester. In addition, students should expect to spend another five hours a week in private study; the language laboratories and computer clusters will be available for use during private study time.

Assessment:  A one-hour written test, to be held in December, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark An aural test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark An oral examination held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark A two-hour written examination in May/June, counting 40% towards the linked modules mark.    

  • Beginner's Language for Supplementary (MOMD)

ITAL M103 (09 08701/09 08702)

Credits : 20 credits (10 in each semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Course Outline: The course will introduce students with no knowledge of Italian to the basic grammatical structures of the language through classroom instruction and exercises, reinforced by private study carried out in the language laboratories, on the computer clusters and at home. By the end of the year, students should be expected to have covered the first 9 units of the course book. Students are encouraged to build up their vocabulary and practise their oral skills in class, and they will also begin to read authentic Italian texts.

Course materials: G. Lazzarino, M.C. Peccianti, J. Aski, A. Dini, Prego! , sixth edition, McGraw Hill, 2004. The course book is available at the University branch of Waterstones, where a special discounted price has been agreed. Any supplementary material will be provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 3 hours language classes in each semester. In addition, students should expect to spend other time per week in private study; the language laboratories and computer clusters will be available for use during private study.

Assessment: A one-hour written test in December, counting 30% towards the linked modules mark. A two-hour written examination in May/June, counting 70% towards the linked modules mark.    

  • Studies in Contemporary Italy

ITAL M107/108 (09 08703/09 08704)

Credits : 20 credits (10 in each semester) Staff: Dr Daniele Albertazzi , Ms Clelia Boscolo

Course  Outline: The course consists of two linked 10-credit modules. The first, called ‘Identity and Politics', taught in the first semester, aims to develop a basic understanding of the formation of national and cultural identity in post-Unification Italy , and to present the outlines of the political history of Italy between 1945 and 2000. In the second semester, in ‘Society and Culture', we aim to develop a basic understanding of some of the more important social forces and structures in play in Italy since 1945, and to introduce students to the idea of cultural change in a late industrial society.

Semester 1: Identity and Politics [ITALMQ07]: the principal topics to be covered through lectures, guided reading and tutorial discussion include:

- the formation of the idea of Italy in its historical and political context;

- the development of the Italian language and its role in the creation of national consciousness;

- the social, political and economic transformation of post-War Italy;

- the role of Christian Democracy and the Catholic Church in Italy after 1945;

- the post-War history of the Italian left, in particular the Italian Communist Party;

- the emergence of new political forces after 1989 and the crisis of the ‘First Republic'.

Semester 2: Society and Culture [ITALMQ08]: the main topics in this part include:

- organized crime and society

- the citizen, the State, and other organizations;

- city, country, suburb and migration;

- the politics of the family;

- gender and age in Italian society;

- the changing face of mass culture in the 1990s.

Teaching : There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars.

Assessment : The course will be assessed by four essays written during the course (25% each). The four essays (max. 1500 words each) will be due in November, January, March and May. One of the essays may be replaced by an oral presentation, counting for 25%.    

  • Italian Project Writing

ITALM112 (0908697/ 0908698)

Credits : 20 credits (10 in each semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Course Outline: The aim of the course is to enable Single Honours students, who have an A-level or equivalent proficiency in Italian, to enhance their ability to write and speak fluently and extensively on a chosen topic. It will introduce students to bibliographical research techniques on a given topic and to ways of structuring projects and of presenting their findings orally in Italian. Students will develop their flexibility in handling Italian through the preparation of one written project and one formal presentation on topics to do with Italian society, culture and literature.

Course materials: Course materials and bibliographies designed to help with different aspects of the course will be supplied by the tutor.

Teaching: There will be one class per week. The course will be conducted through class work and course assignments, with regular written and oral contributions by students. The course will run for the whole of the academic year.

Assessment: The course will be assessed by a written project of 2000 words in Italian to be submitted by 9 January 2006 (worth 50% of the final mark), and by a formal oral presentation given during week commencing 24 April 2006 . This will also be worth 50% of the final mark.    


Courses available for Second Year Non-Italian Erasmus and Exchange Students

  • Second Year Intermediate Italian

Course Code : ITAL M211 ( 09 12615/09 12616)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Pre-requisites: Beginners Italian Language in Year 1 or equivalent knowledge

Outline: These linked modules provide instruction in written, oral and aural elements of the language, through a variety of classroom activities and home assignments. Students also perform a wide range of exercises in spoken and written Italian based on the course book. There are language laboratory classes and use is also made of CALL and satellite facilities. Classes are mainly conducted in Italian.

Course materials: Italiano, F. and Marchegiani-Jones, I. , Crescendo , D.C. Heath, 1995. Boscolo, C., Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005 Supplementary material provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 4 hours language classes, including some language laboratory work, in each semester

Assessment: A one-hour written test held in December, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark. A two-hour written examination held in May/June, counting 40% towards the linked modules mark. An aural test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark. An oral test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark.  

   

  • Second Year Advanced Italian

Course Code : ITAL M212 ( 09 12617/09 12618)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Pre-requisites : Advanced Italian Language in Year 1 (ITALM102: 09 08695/09 08696) or equivalent knowledge

Outline: The linked modules provide instruction in written, oral and aural elements of the language, through a variety of classroom activities and home assignments. Students also perform a wide range of exercises in spoken and written Italian based on the course book. There are language laboratory classes and use is also made of CALL and satellite facilities. Classes are conducted in Italian.

Course materials: Bozzone Costa, R., Viaggio nell'italiano, Loescher, 2004. Boscolo, C., Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005 Supplementary material provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 4 hours language classes, including some language laboratory work, in each semester. In addition, students should expect to spend another 3 hours per week in private study; the language laboratories and computer clusters will be available for use during private study. Assessment A one-hour written test held in December, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark. A two-hour written examination held in May/June, counting 40% towards the linked modules mark. An aural test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark. An oral test held in April/May, counting 20% towards the linked modules mark.    

  • Second Year Intermediate Italian for Supplementary (MOMD)

Course Code : ITAL M210 ( 09 12627/09 12628)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo

Pre-requisites: Beginners Italian Language for Supplementary (ITAL M103: 09 08701/09 08702) or equivalent knowledge.

Course Outline: These linked modules provide instruction in written, oral and aural elements of the language, through a variety of classroom activities and home assignments. Students also perform a wide range of exercises in spoken and written Italian based on the course book. There are language laboratory classes and use is also made of CALL and satellite facilities. Classes are mainly conducted in Italian.

Course materials: G. Lazzarino, M.C. Peccianti, J. Aski, A. Dini, Prego! , sixth edition, McGraw Hill, 2004. C.Boscolo, Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005 The course book is available at the University branch of Waterstones, where a special discounted price has been agreed. Any supplementary material will be provided by the course tutor.

Teaching: 11 weeks x 3 hours language classes in each semester, including some language laboratory work. In addition, students should expect to spend other time per week in private study; the language laboratories and computer clusters will be available for use during private study. Assessment A one-hour written test held in December, counting 25% towards the linked modules mark. A two-hour written examination held in May/June, counting 50% towards the linked modules mark. An oral test held in April/May, counting 25% towards the linked modules mark.    

  

  • Historical Structures and Contemporary Sounds of the Italian Language 

Course codes: ITALM221 (09 12617/09 12618)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Dr Paolo De Ventura

The aim of the course is to develop a basic understanding of the major issues related to language in general and to the Italian language in particular.

The course will combine two main perspectives:

(1) the diachronic dimension, i.e. the development of the Italian language in a historical perspective from its origins to our own century;

(2) the sociolinguistic perspective, i.e. description of the main varieties of contemporary Italian; and the notions of register, ‘plurilinguismo' and ‘linguaggi settoriali' in the Italian context.

Teaching:  There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars.

Assessment : Two essays (25% each) of approx. 2500 words each, one in each semester

One two-hour written examination (50%), covering both semesters, held in May/June.    

  • Dante's Comedy and Its World A and B

Course Codes: ITAL M231   09 12621 / 09 12622

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Dr Paolo De Ventura

The modules look at the story-telling aspects of Dante’s poem, at its spiritual message and dramatic presentation as well as at the religious and political themes characterising the European Middle Ages.  As Virgil and Beatrice guide the pilgrim through the mysteries of the Other World, from the dark forest to the celestial beauty of the Empyrean, so the course aims to guide the students in discovering the fascination of Dante’s own world, a world that encompasses personal experience, historical analysis, classical traditions and Christian faith in the highest synthesis ever attempted in Western Literature.  To fully appreciate the “divine” poetry of the “Father of the Italian language”, passages from the original text will be read, analysed and discussed in class.

Semester 1: Inferno

Semester 2: Purgatorio and Paradiso

Teaching : 6 weeks x 2 hours lectures and 4 weeks x 1 hour seminar each semester

Assessment : One essay of 2,500 words, to be submitted in January (33%). One two-hour written examination, held in May/June (67%)

  • The Italian Courts A

Course Codes: ITALM241 (09 12635)

Credits: 10 (1 semester only) Staff: Gerry Slowey

The course introduces students to the study of the Renaissance and, in particular, to the life of the courts. It aims to familiarise students with political and cultural events, helping them to interpret some of the key concepts of the period, for instance humanism and the rediscovery of the classics.

The course examines the development of the great courts of Italy (e.g. the Medici family in Florence , the duchies of Urbino, Milan , Ferrara , the Kingdom of Naples ). It continues with an examination of art as propaganda and at the links between painting and other areas of cultural life, most notably neo-platonism. The course also looks at literary production in the period, including B. Castiglione, Il cortegiano , and the chivalrous epic tradition in Ferrara , as well as the links between poetry and music.

Teaching: There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars.

Assessment : One assessed essay (approx. 2500 words) to be submitted in week 10 of the course (25%)

One two-hour written examination in May/June (50%) which covers both ITALM241 and ITALM242.

  • The Italian Courts B

ITALM242 (0912636)

10 credits (Semester 2 only) Staff: Mr Gerry Slowey

The course begins with an examination of the main problems concerning different artistic activities: intellectual training for writers and artists, the art market and the ‘taste' of the period, patronage (both lay and religious). It examines the different historical and cultural aspects of life, looking at political and religious ceremonies and rituals, as well as at family life. It also focuses on the main institutions which form the core of court cultural life: universities, schools, academies, monasteries and convents. Finally, it examines the social norms and laws in relationships concerning aspects of everyday life, such as criminality, prostitution, poverty and marginalisation.

Teaching : There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars.

Assessment : One assessed essay (approx. 2500 words) to be submitted at the end of the semester (25%)

One two-hour written examination in May/June which covers both ITALM241 and ITALM242 (50%).

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Courses available for Final Year Erasmus and Exchange Students

Please note: These modules are available to non-native Italian speakers

  • Final Year Italian

Course Code : ITAL M411 ( 09 14607/ 09 14608)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo, Dr Charlotte Ross

Outline These linked modules are divided into three sections: •  Translation from Italian •  Italian Prose Variety •  Oral and Aural Italian Section 1 concentrates particularly on comprehension, on the stylistic features of the original and the target languages and on the problems associated with appropriateness of register in the target language. Section 2 examines different types and registers of Italian prose writing. Their distinctive features will be analysed and reproduced in the students' own prose writing. Grammatical, syntactical and lexical features of Italian will also be examined and explained in the light of the passages dealt with and the students' work. The types of prose examined in the First Semester will be: informal, formal and commercial letters, letters to newspapers and magazines; newspaper language and newspaper articles: di cronaca , economici, di fondo ; cvs. In the Second Semester , the following types pf prose will be examined: reviews of films, books, theatre productions, musical features and television programmes; the language of advertising. This section will also cover cultural elements related to the types of prose examined: in the First Semester , these will be the world of work and the press in Italy ; in the Second Semester , the world of the media and the world of advertising in Italy . Elements of lexical interference between Italian and English will also be examined in this section throughout the course. Section 3 concentrates particularly on spoken Italian. The section is based on a series of topics, relevant to modern Italian society. Students will be exposed to aural and written authentic material which will form the basis for classroom discussion, group and individual presentations. Course materials There are no set texts, but students are advised to have a copy of C. Boscolo, Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005, and either M. Maiden, C. Robustelli, A Reference Grammar of Modern Italian , Arnold, 2000 or A. Proudfoot, F. Cardo, Modern Italian Grammar. A Practical Guide , Routledge, 1997. Students are also expected to have an approved monolingual dictionary, such as Lo Zingarelli Minore .

Teaching: There will be one contact hour per fortnight each for Sections 1 and 2. There will be one contact hour per week for Section 3.

Assessment: One 1-hour assessed piece each for Sections 1 and 2 per semester, counting 30% towards the mark for these linked modules. One 2-hour written examination, held in May/June, counting 30% towards the mark for these linked modules. One 25-minute oral examination, held in May, counting 20% towards the mark for these linked modules. One 1-hour aural test, held in May, counting 20% towards the mark for these linked modules.  

Please note: This module is available to non-native Italian speakers only.

  • Essay in Italian and Summary from English into Italian

Course Code : ITAL M412 (09 14609/ 09 14610)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester) Staff: Ms Clelia Boscolo.

Outline: These linked modules will examine in detail: various techniques aimed at the analysis of titles, the choice of logical ordering criteria and the preparation of essay plans in Italian; issues of register, lexis and style appropriate to essay writing in Italian. They will further examine the techniques that pertain the summarising of texts of various types, and written in various styles and registers from English into Italian: from selecting and discriminating between essential and marginal elements in the text to the rendering of various grammatical, syntactical, lexical and idiomatic features into Italian.

Course materials : There are no set texts, but students are advised to have a copy of C. Boscolo, Upgrade Your Italian , Hodder Arnold, 2005 and either M. Maiden, C. Robustelli, A Reference Grammar of Modern Italian , Arnold, 2000 or A. Proudfoot, F. Cardo, Modern Italian Grammar. A Practical Guide , Routledge, 1997. Students are also expected to have an approved monolingual dictionary, such as Lo Zingarelli Minore .

Assessment : Two 1-hour assessed pieces (1 essay, 1 sum mary ) per semester, counting 50% towards the mark for these linked modules. One 2-hour written examination, held in May/June, counting 50% towards the mark for these linked modules. 

  • Italian Comic Theatre: from the Renaissance to the Eighteenth Century A and B

Course Code: ITAL M444 (09 12630/09 12632)

Credits: 20 credits Staff: Mr Gerry Slowey

The first of two linked modules will examine the growth of comic theatre in Italy in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, considering aspects such as the development from “novella” to “commedia” and the difference between “teatro popolare” and “teatro erudito”. Particular consideration will be given to plays by Ariosto, Machiavelli, Bibbiena and Bruno. The module will also examine aspects of commedia dell'arte and links between spoken theatre and music theatre.

The second of two linked modules will examine comic theatre in Italy in the eighteenth century, considering aspects such as the influence of commedia dell'arte, particularly in the theatre of Goldoni and Gozzi, paying attention to the disputes over the use of the fantastic or everyday realism on the stage, particularly in Venice . The module will also look at the links between opera and comedy, drawing on, in addition to works by Gozzi and Goldoni, the comic librettos produced by Da Ponte, particularly those he wrote for Mozart.

Teaching : There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars

Assessment : One essay of 3000 words, to be submitted in January, counting 25% of the mark for these linked modules

One three-hour written examination, held in May/June, counting 75% of the mark for these modules.  

  • Leopardi

Course Code : ITAL 455 (0914617/0914618)

Credits: 20 (10 per semester)

Staff: Prof Michael Caesar

Outline: The course aims to introduce students to the writings of Giacomo Leopardi, and analyse them within the context of contemporary Italian and European literary, cultural and intellectual tradition.

Course materials: G. Leopardi, Canti (any paperback edition) G. Leopardi, Operette morali, ed. C. Galimberti, Naples , Guida, 1985, 3rd ed. G. Leopardi, Zibaldone di pensieri (selected passages on hand-outs)

Suggested reading: V. Guarracino, Guida alla lettura di Leopardi, Milan , Mondadori W. Binni, La protesta di Leopardi, Florence A. Tilgher, La filosofia di Leopardi, Bologna , Boni. A. Prete , Il pensiero poetante, Milan , Feltrinelli. B. Ferrucci, Leopardi filosofo e le ragioni della poesia, Venice , Marsilio

Teaching : There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars Assessment Assessment is by means of a dissertation (6000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliographies) due in May (100%).

  • Modernism and Postmodernism in the Italian Novel - NOT RUNNING IN 2008/09 -

Course codes : ITALM457 (09 14618/09 14619)

Credits : 20 credits (10 per semester)

Staff: Dr Clodagh Brook , Prof. Michael Caesar

The first semester introduces Italian modernism in prose and theatre, followed by an examination of key works by Luigi Pirandello, Italo Svevo and Carlo Emilio Gadda. The second semester focuses on the interplay between literary theory and writing practice in Italo Calvino, Antonio Tabucchi and Umberto Eco. Topics to be addressed include the role of the reader, the gendering of the text, the representation of history and the postmodern interfusion of the genres.

Teaching : There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars

Assessment: One essay, due in January (25%)

One three-hour written examination in May/June (75%).    

  • Italian Identities in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Course codes : ITAL M459 A&B (0918876/0918877)

Credits: 20 credits (10 per semester)

Staff:  Dr Charlotte Ross

The course considers questions of identity in Italy during the 20th and 21st centuries, analysing the 'self' as a socially and culturally constructed being, subject to dominant pressures from a variety of sources (the state, the church, the media, socio-cultural norms, etc.). Drawing on theoretical and critical approaches to such issues, both Anglophone and Italophone, lectures and seminars will focus on four broad areas: gender roles and family relationships; feminism; sexuality; immigrant communities. Although each topic raises specific questions, all four can be seen as resulting from the dismantling of logocentric grand narratives enabled by the post-structuralist and deconstructionist projects of the 1960s. The various theoretical, literary and film texts which we will study foreground and explore fragmented and marginalised voices and also provide a lens to examine the impact of broad historico-political phenomena on the individual. Lectures and seminar discussion will consider relevant theoretical reflections on subjectivity and identity and analyse the dramatisation or illustration of theoretical concepts through cultural texts. Connections will be sought between the four sets of issues, which remain live and provocative in contemporary Italy.

Teaching: There will be two contact hours per week, divided between lectures and seminars

Assessment : Two essays, due in January and April (50%) One two-hour written examination in May/June (50%)    

  •  Reading Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio, A and B

Course Codes : tbc

Credits : 20 credits (10 per semester) Staff : Dr Paolo De Ventura

The Florentine “Three Crowns”, well beyond a mere patrimony of the Italian culture, represent the highest literary achievements of the European Middle Ages, shaping the cultural background for the development of the Renaissance Humanism. Along with the awareness of the historical and cultural context, the course aims to provide the analytical tools necessary to understand - and enjoy - the complexity and fascination of the pages written by Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio.

In the first term, students will read Dante’s Vita Nova, and follow the development of Dante’s discourse of love through relevant passages in the Comedy. The unresolved, the harmonious and conflicted notion of love will then be explored through selected readings from Petrarca’s Rime.  In the second term, a thorough reading of Boccaccio’s Decameron, a book dedicated to the “beautiful, gracious, enamoured women”, will offer an understanding of its elegant, witty and realistic narrative, that brings to life its contemporary world and its new, “modern” values.

Teaching: One 1 hour lecture weekly, along with one 1 hour seminar based on student-led discussion

Assessment: One  2,500 word essay, to be submitted in January (30%). One  2,500 word essay, to be submitted in April (30%). Final exam (40%)

  • Sociolinguistics, Literature and Today's Italian Languages - NOT RUNNING IN 2008/09 -

Course Codes : ITALM462 A&B (0919573/0919574)

Credits : 20 credits (10 per semester)

Staff : Dr Paolo De Ventura

This course will enable students to gain an understanding of the basic principles of sociolinguistics. It will give them the opportunity for understanding the differences of language use in contexts which vary according to region, social classes, levels of formality, means and ways of communication. The course is split into the following linked modules: - First semester: “Sociolinguistics in Italian literature from Dante to Pasolini” This module will focus on the mimetic function in the literary language. How can a poet or a novelist re-create the speech of a king, a peasant, a woman in love, a man at war, a young child or a subproletarian youngster in the outskirts of Rome ? We will attempt to answer this by analysing the various devices employed by literary authors to build their characters linguistically and make them believable. - Second semester: “Diatopic, diastratic, diaphasic and diamesic varieties in today's Italian languages” This module will focus on today's uses of the Italian language(s), as heard on the television or read in newspapers, magazines, and the Internet. We will read an Italian best-seller short novel by Enrico Brizzi, a young author who wrote in an unfiltered and unrefined language, as if he were just talking casually with us, or thinking aloud. As this course is strongly oriented towards practice and usage, an essential part of it will be for the students to conduct their own research on contemporary materials, and report back to the class.

Assessment: 30% First term response paper; 30% Second term response paper; 40% Research project (to be presented in class (April-May)  


Courses available for Italian native-speaker Erasmus and Exchange Students

Please note: These modules are available for native Italian-speaking Erasmus and Exchange students only.

  • Translation Theory and Practice in Europe A& B (Italian)

Course Code : 09 20555 & 09 20560 Credits: 20  Staff: Clelia Boscolo

In semester 1, the course will focus on approaches to the theory and practice of translation in Europe. It will address the main areas of debate in Translation Theory and Translation Studies, with a historical survey of key theoretical texts and comparative and contrastive analysis of translations into English. It will then cover key approaches, skills and resources available to the translator. In semester 2, students will be expected to agree a project with their tutor, for which they will translate a text from Italian to English and provide commentary on the text either in the form of annotations or in a separate analytical essay. The student will be expected to contextualise their project within the debates and issues discussed in the first semester, utilising appropriate approaches and resources. Periodical tutorial and/or seminar support will be provided.

Assessment: Part A (semester 1): One 15-minute presentation on an aspect of translation theory or studies as applied to translation to/from the student's main language, revised and presented in written form. (25% of final module mark)

Part B (semester 2): One 6,000-word translation project, of which at least 3,000 words are in the form of an analytical commentary on the translation (75% of final mark)

Contact:

Dr Ita Mac Carthy

Email: i.maccarthy@bham.ac.uk

 Phone: +44 121 414 7505