Music

Module information for incoming Erasmus and Exchange students interested in modules in Music.

Pre-requisites

Evidence of qualifications in Music need to shown before students can undertake any of the music-related topics.

Experience and proficiency

Other modules may be available to students with an appropriate level of experience and proficiency. As most modules in Music are wholly or mainly academic in content, please note that proficiency as a performer will not normally be sufficient to gain admission. Further details can be obtained from the contact at the end of the page.

University Links

Additional provision will be made for music institutions with special links to the Music Department.


List of Music Modules

  • Context 1a: The Age of Extremes 10 credits

Weekly lectures, to include musical examples, backed up by extensive listening assignments. An historical survey of music in the twentieth century, focusing on major trends (serialism, experimentalism, electroacoustic music) and people.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the module the student will be able to:

• recognise and contextualise a range of twentieth-century musics, through a familiarity with techniques, styles, and diversity of compositional resources.

• understand the major trends, developments and underlying thought in twentieth-century musics

• engage with new and unfamiliar musical languages, expression and process

• understand the links (and differences) between twentieth-century musics and earlier music

• understand the place of music in the wider artistic context.

Staff: Professor Jonty Harrison and Dr Vic Hoyland

Assessment: 40% Two essays (3,000 words in total; need not be of equal length), submitted as directed.

60% Listening test in the main examination period.

  • Context 1b: The Age of Common Practice 10 credits

The aim of this module is to familiarise students with the music of the ‘long eighteenth century', also known as the ‘age of common practice', by examining representative examples by such composers as Corelli, Handel, Bach, Haydn, and Mozart, whilst placing them in their wider cultural context.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the module the student will be able to:

• demonstrate basic analytical understanding of the works studied in class

• understand how music developed during this period and how it acted as a precursor to developments in the Romantic period

• express the understanding that has been gained by means of good written English and through appropriate technical vocabulary

Staff: Professor Colin Timms, Professor John Whenham and Dr Matthew Riley

Assessment : 40% Two essays (3,000 words in total; need not be of equal length), submitted as directed.

60% Listening test in the main examination period.

  • Context 2a: The Age of Romanticism 10 credits

The course comprises an overview of western art music in the so-called Romantic period, broadly comprising the nineteenth-century. Both the music and its cultural context will be studied, and areas covered may include: the evolution of the Teutonic tradition from Beethoven to Strauss via such composers as Schubert, Schumann, Weber, Brahms, Wagner, Liszt and Wolf; the Italian operatic tradition represented by Rossini, Donizetti, Bellini, Verdi and Puccini; the emergence of the ‘national’ traditions in such places as Russia, Bohemia and Great Britain; the French operatic and instrumental traditions including composers such as Meyerbeer, Berlioz, Massenet and Saint-Saëns. Learning Outcomes: The student should be able to:

• demonstrate a broad knowledge of western art music of the Romantic period and the cultural context in which it was composed;

• describe and evaluate the nature of and changes in musical style within the period studied;

• outline the impact of cultural, social, and political movements and trends upon composers and their music within the period studied;

• cite and, where appropriate, analyse, specific and suitable pieces of music as examples in support of their commentaries and evaluations.

Staff: Ken Hamilton (co-ordinator), Matthew Riley, Paul Rodmell, Colin Timms

Assessment: 50% Essay 2500–3000 words, to be submitted by the date specified in the Diary. 50% Exam taken during the main examination period.

  • Context 2b: Continuity and Change  10 credits; Semester 2

This module comprises a survey of selected areas of the music of the Middle Ages, Renaissance and early Baroque. Both the music and its cultural context will be studied, and areas covered may include: the place and function of music within both monastic and secular communities, including princely courts; monodic traditions; the development of polyphonic music; the contribution of selected composers, who may include Perotin, Machaut, Dufay, Dunstable, Josquin, Palestrina, Marenzio, Lassus, Tallis, Byrd, and Monteverdi; the role of groups of musicians such as monks, troubadours and trouvères, chapel singers and instrumental consorts; the wider cultural and social context in which music existed in this period. Learning Outcomes: The student should be able to:

• demonstrate a broad knowledge of European music from the approximate period 1000 to 1650 and the cultural context in which it was composed;

• describe and evaluate the nature of and changes in musical style within the period studied;

• outline the impact of cultural and social trends upon musicians and their music within the period studied;

• cite and, where appropriate, analyse, specific and suitable pieces of music as examples in support of their commentaries and evaluations.

Staff: John Whenham (co-ordinator), Colin Timms, Mary O’Neill

Assessment: 50% Essay 2500–3000 words, to be submitted by the date specified in the Diary. 50% Exam taken during the main examination period.


For further information on modules offered in Music:

Dr Kenneth Hamilton

k.l.hamilton@bham.ac.uk