Understanding European Identities

Centre for Russian and East European Studies, School of Government and Society

College of Social Sciences

Details

Code 18495

Level of study First Year

Credit value 20

Semester 1 and 2

Pre-requisite modules Where students take this course as a 10 credit unit they will be expected to undertake self directed study of the material not covered from the readin

Module description

The module will start from a brief consideration of typical European issues. It will then consider how contemporary understandings of what does and does not constitute 'European-ness' have been formed by their cultural historical trajectories, looking at themes such as Empire and the rise of the nation state, religion, the Enlightenment, colonialism, authoritarianism/democracy, post-colonialism, transnationalism, globalisation and localisation, and the processes of 'othering'.

The module will then proceed to substantial consideration of how competing markers of European-ness and non-European-ness are played out in current European debates, with particular reference to the construction of a 'shared European past' and a 'common European identity'. A deeper understanding of such identity debates will be achieved by drawing on relevant cultural theorists such as Stuart Hall, Michel Foucault, Homi Bhabha, and Julie Kristeva in a manner appropriate to a Level C course.

Teaching and learning methods

These courses are taught by a combination of lectures, classes and directed reading.

This module is available as:
Autumn term only 10 credit unit – 3,000 word assessed essay
Spring term only 10 credit unit – 3,000 word assessed essay
Whole Year 20 credit unit – 2,000 word summative essay (50%) and 3 hour examination (50%).