Student project shortlisted for UK BSc Final Year Computer Science Project 2013

Posted on Thursday 25th July 2013
Horatio Caine

Horatio’s project is a great example of how students in the School of Computer Science can get involved with cutting edge research that is going on here. He fully deserved to be shortlisted for this national prize!

Horatio Caine graduated in July with a first class BSc Computer Science Year in Industry degree. His excellent research-focused final year project resulted in him being shortlisted as a finalist for one of the UK’s Computer Science competitions. The CREST (Centre for Research on Evolution, Science and Testing) annual prize for UK BSc Final Year Computer Science Projects is open to all final year undergraduate computer science students in the UK and projects were assessed by members of the CREST team at University College London.    


Horatio’s first-rate final year project involved using nature-inspired computation to improve the tracking of objects across a network of cameras. The excellence of Horatio’s project can be appreciated in how it has actively contributed towards the School’s research into the EU-funded  EPiCS project. In this specific project the School of Computer Science is leading work on concepts and foundations for self-aware and self-expressive computing systems.  

 

The official title of Horatio’s project was The Prediction and Classification for Optimisation of Object Tracking in Market-Based Networks of Distributed Smart Cameras and was supervised by Dr. Peter Lewis who said, Horatio’s project is a great example of how students in the School of Computer Science can get involved with cutting edge research that is going on here. He fully deserved to be shortlisted for this national prize!’

Horatio said, ‘I chose to do a research-focused final year project rather than one that is software-focused to get a taste of academic research while I am still at university. This turned out to be a great choice because my work builds on current research by academics in the School, so I was pleased to be able to contribute to the system they use in their own research. This also meant that my work was more than just an assignment to obtain marks so overall I am delighted with the result of my project.’

Horatio’s triumphs also led him to achieve Best Student in Computer Science Award which he received during his graduation ceremony this July. The School has been so impressed with Horatio and the work he has produced that he has been appointed Research Associate with CERCIA (Centre of Excellence for Research in Computational Intelligence and Applications) over the summer, allowing him to continue contributing towards the EPiCS project. Dr. Lewis and Horatio will also be submitting the project to the International Conference on Distributed Smart Cameras (ICDSC) in the autumn.