Professor Lord Robert Winston to speak alongside Ken Clarke MP and Lord Patten at Universities for Europe event

Location
Tuke Theatre Regent's University London
Dates
Tuesday 10th May 2016 (18:00-19:30)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)

Renowned academic Professor Lord Robert Winston has been added to a line-up of high-profile speakers for our forthcoming Universities for Europe event on 10 May 2016.

In the week that we mark Europe Day – an annual celebration of peace and unity in Europe – Lord Winston will speak alongside Ken Clarke MP and Lord Patten to discuss the EU referendum, its implications for British universities and the future of the country.

Lord Winston is Professor of Science and Society and Emeritus Professor of Fertility Studies at Imperial College London. He is also Chancellor of Sheffield Hallam University and Chairman of the governing body of the Royal College of Music.

Ken Clarke served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1993–1997. He has also held a number of other important positions in government, including secretary of state for health, home secretary and secretary of state for education.

Lord Patten has been Chancellor of the University of Oxford since 2003. As the former governor of Hong Kong and European commissioner for external relations he has played a key role in international diplomacy. Lord Patten also served as an MP from 1979–1992, holding a number of senior positions in government.

Chaired by Katie Razzall, Special Correspondent, BBC Newsnight, this important discussion will take place on Tuesday 10 May from 18.00–19.30 in the Tuke Theatre at Regent’s University London, which is situated within Regent’s Park. The event will be opened by Professor Aldwyn Cooper, Vice-Chancellor and Chief Executive of Regent’s University London. A drinks reception will take place after the event.

Join in the discussion on Twitter using the hashtag #UnisForEU.

The Universities for Europe campaign aims to highlight the value of the UK’s membership of the EU to our universities – and why this matters to the British public, economy and society.