Members

Faculty members and their research supervision areas

Dr Hugh Adlington

Senior Lecturer

Department of English Literature

My research interests are primarily in the area of early modern literature (1500-1800), particularly religious poetry and prose, the works of John Donne, John Milton and Thomas Browne, the history of the book, and textual editing. Selected works-in-progress include a monograph on John Donne's library and reading, and a scholarly edition of John Donne's sermons. I enjoy teaching widely across our ...

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 5672
Email
h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk

I am interested in supervising MA, MRes and PhD candidates in the following areas and will be pleased to respond to enquiries:

  • John Donne and his contemporaries
  • Seventeenth-century religious poetry and prose
  • John Milton and his contemporaries
  • Early modern print and manuscript culture

Research projects currently or recently supervised or co-supervised include:

  • PhD, ‘Soteriology in the Writing of Edmund Spenser’
  • PhD, ‘Prose Style in Quaker Writings, 1645-70: A Corpus Linguistics Approach’
  • PhD, ‘Transforming Paradise Lost: Translation and Reception of John Milton's Writing in the Arab-Muslim World’
  • PhD, ‘Representations of Persia and Persians on the English Stage, 1580-1660’
  • PhD, ‘The Early Modern English Literary Canon’
  • PhD, ‘Joyce and Milton: A Reception Study’
  • PhD, ‘Conceptualising Paradise: Seventeenth Century Ecology and the Adaptation of Genre in the Works of John Milton’
  • PhD, ‘The Textual Self: Authorship and Agency in John Donne’s Commemorative Writing’
  • PhD, ‘Donne and Music’  

Find out more - our PhD English Literature  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Maureen Bell

Dr Maureen Bell

Honorary Reader in English Literature

Department of English Literature

Now retired from the University, I continue to contribute to the University’s research profile as Director of the British Book Trade Index and through my continuing research and publications.

Email
m.bell@bham.ac.uk

Dr Louise Curran

Dr Louise Curran

Lecturer in Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century English Literature

Department of English Literature

I research eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English literature, especially letter-writing and literary celebrity, the novel, and the links between material forms and textual meanings.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 8697
Email
l.curran@bham.ac.uk

I welcome enquiries about research supervision in the following areas: letter-writing and archive formation, literary fame and celebrity, the eighteenth-century novel and prose style, life-writing from the eighteenth-century to the Romantic period.


Find out more - our PhD English Literature  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Malcolm Dick

Dr Malcolm Dick

Lecturer in Regional and Local History
Director, Centre for West Midlands History

Department of History

I am a social and regional historian with teaching and research interests in the history of the West Midlands region after 1700 and the history of ethnic minorities and anti-slavery. I am also Editor-in-Chief of the History West Midlands project.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 415 8253
Email
m.m.dick@bham.ac.uk

I am able to offer supervision in the following areas:

  • The history of the West Midlands since 1700
  • The social and cultural history of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries

I have successfully supervised several research degrees since 2010. These include:

  • Close Encounters: The Personal and Social Life of Anna Seward, 1742-1809 (with English), MLitt, 2011
  • Robert Bage's contribution to social equality (with English), MLitt, 2011
  • Elizabeth Cadbury, 1858-1951 (AHRC Collaborative PhD with Birmingham Archives and Heritage and the Centre for Quaker Studies), PhD, 2012
  • Constructing the eighteenth-century woman: the life and education of Sabrina Sidney, PhD, 2013
  • ‘To the Bull Ring!’ Politics Protest and Policing in Birmingham during the early Chartist period, MRes, 2014
  • Samuel Johnson: a promoter of useful knowledge and social improvement, PhD, 2014

I am also supervising several research theses at the present time

  • The cultural journey of Anne Yearsley 1753- 1806
  • The carriage of goods in and out of Birmingham in the eighteenth century
  • Industrialisation and urbanisation in Broseley, Shropshire
  • The origins, development and influence of William Shenstone’s landscape design at the Leasowes, Halesowen
  • Paying the price for industrialisation: the experience of a Black Country town, Oldbury, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
  • Intellectual communities and industry in Shropshire in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries
  • The origins, development and influence of William Shenstone’s landscape design at the Leasowes, Halesowen
  • Urban gardens in the West Midlands manufacturing towns of the eighteenth century
  • George Edmunds and the making of Birmingham radicalism
  • Entrepreneurial influence and technological change: the rise and decline of the West Midlands cut-nail trade, c.1811-1914
  • The development of reformatory and industrial schools in Victorian Birmingham, 1850 to c. 1900
  • Medical care in the workhouses in Birmingham and Wolverhampton, 1839-1912
  • The development of a late nineteenth-century Birmingham suburb: Moseley, 1850-1900
  • Reasons to remember: commemorating the great and the good in late Victorian and Edwardian Birmingham
  • Birmingham exceptionalism, Joseph Chamberlain and the 1906 general election
  • Birmingham manufacturing and its workforce during the Second World War
  • Politics, governance and the shaping of Smethwick since 1945

Find out more - our PhD History  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Professor Michael Dobson

Professor Michael Dobson

Director of the Shakespeare Institute; Professor of Shakespeare Studies

Shakespeare Institute

Like his own Falstaff, Shakespeare is not only witty in himself but is the cause that wit is in others. My career as a teacher of and writer about Shakespeare’s plays and poems has been devoted not just to examining these extraordinary writings in their sixteenth- and seventeenth-century contexts, but to exploring how they have stimulated and enabled the creativity of other people, ...

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 9508
Email
m.dobson@bham.ac.uk

I supervise research students interested in: the performance and reception history of the Shakespeare canon, both within the Anglophone world and beyond; the work of the Royal Shakespeare Company; the history of amateur performance; Shakespeare’s afterlives.


Find out more - our PhD Shakespeare Studies  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Elystan Griffiths

Dr Elystan Griffiths

Senior Lecturer in German

Department of Modern Languages

I teach widely across the curriculum in German Studies, including  language, literature and cinema. My research interests include social and political writing of the 18th and 19th centuries, women’s writing and the pastoral.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 6178
Email
e.griffiths@bham.ac.uk

I welcome approaches from PhD students on topics relating to German culture, thought and history of the 18th and 19th centuries, and on German cinema.

I am currently supervising Helen Tatlow’s M3C-funded PhD project on translation and adaptation of The works of Heinrich von Kleist in anglophone translation and adaptation.

Previous projects that I have supervised to successful completion are as follows:


Find out more - our PhD German Studies  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Professor Karen Harvey

Professor Karen Harvey

Professorial Fellow and Professor of Cultural History

Department of History

I am a British historian working on the long eighteenth century, with particular interests in gender, the body, material culture and public history.

Telephone
+44(0)121 41 58190
Email
k.l.harvey@bham.ac.uk

I offer PhD supervision in several areas of eighteenth-century British history, particularly cultural and social history and the history of gender. I welcome collaborations with external partners. I am currently supervising PhDs on women and negative emotions (Laura Alston), the nineteenth-century illustrated book (Will Finley), eighteenth-century illegitimacy (Kate Gibson), leather in the early modern period (Tom Rusbridge), servants at eighteenth-century Chatsworth (Hannah Wallace) and eighteenth-century Cannon Hall (Nicola Walker).


Find out more - our PhD History  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Professor David Hill

Emeritus Professor of German Studies

Department of Modern Languages

My main research interests lie in the literature, culture and society of Germany around the end of the eighteenth century.

Email
d.d.hill@bham.ac.uk

Dr Tom Lockwood

Dr Tom Lockwood

Reader in English Literature
Director of Education, College of Arts and Law

Department of English Literature

My teaching and my research interests move across the early modern and into the Romantic periods, with a particular focus on the way in which later writers respond to, adapt and receive earlier writers. My current projects include research on Charles Lamb's reading of early modern drama for a new OUP edition of his Complete Works, responses to Ben Jonson in the Restoration and Romantic periods, ...

Telephone
0121 414 5679
Email
t.e.lockwood@bham.ac.uk

I welcome enquiries from prospective graduate students across the range of my teaching and research interests.

I have been the lead or co-supervisor for a number of students who have completed their doctorates:

  • Wendy Trevor, whose thesis explored the varieties of dramatised male friendship in the early modern period;
  • Natalie Aldred, who edited William Haughton's play, Englishmen for My Money;
  • Harry Newman, whose thesis explored questions of impression and identity in Shakespeare, and who is now a Lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London;
  • Kerry Gilbert, who wrote on professionalism in Angel Day's manual, The English Secretary.

I am currently lead or co-supervisor for the following students:

  • Debra Weston, who is working on Gothic drama on the Romantic stage;
  • Jennie Challinor, whose AHRC-funded research explores the drama of the 1670-71 season;
  • Neil Halliday, who is writing on De Quincey and Romantic autobiography;
  • Aurora Martinez, who is writing on pastoral from Marvell to Wordsworth;
  • Phil Jones, who is writing on the reception of Samuel Johnson;
  • Georgina Hildick-Smith, who is writing on education and value in early modern drama;
  • James McCrink, who is writing on medical thinking and literary creativity in Romantic texts.

I am interested in supervising MA, MPhil and PhD candidates in the following areas and will be pleased to respond to enquiries:

  • Early modern poetry and drama, including Shakespeare
  • Romantic writing
  • The relationships of Renaissance and Romantic writers
  • Ben Jonson and his contemporaries
  • Charles Lamb and his collaborators
  • The relationships of manuscript and print

Find out more - our PhD English Literature  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Professor Jonathan Reinarz

Professor Jonathan Reinarz

Director, Social Studies in Medicine

Institute of Applied Health Research

Professor Jonathan Reinarz is the Director of The History of Medicine Unit. He is Professor of the History of Medicine.

Jonathan has published extensively on the history of hospitals and medical education, including a history of the Birmingham teaching hospitals (Boydell, 2009) and, with Graham Mooney (Johns Hopkins) a history of hospital and asylum visiting (2009). He has recently ...

Telephone
+44 (0)121 415 8122/PA: Gillian Dunne +44 (0)121 415 8174
Email
j.reinarz@bham.ac.uk

Jonathan is interested in supervising doctoral research students in the following areas:

  • The history of medical institutions, including hospitals, workhouses, dispensaries and medical schools since 1750
  • The history of health and illness in the English midlands
  • The history of patients’ experiences of health and illness over the last two centuries
  • Children’s health and illness, and institutional care since 1750
  • The history of the senses and particularly the cultural history of smell
  • The history of skin, especially burns
  • The history of alcohol since 1750 

Dr Kate Rumbold

Dr Kate Rumbold

Senior Lecturer

Department of English Literature

I’m a Senior Lecturer in English Literature, and I teach across all periods of literature, especially the early modern period and eighteenth century. As a researcher, I’m interested the way Shakespeare is quoted and valued in literature and culture, from his own lifetime to the twenty-first century.  

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 8054
Email
k.l.rumbold@bham.ac.uk

I’ve supported several doctoral researchers in the successful completion of theses on the reception of Shakespeare from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, including an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award with Winchester College Fellows’ Library.  I would be delighted to supervise  further postgraduate research in:

  • Eighteenth-century fiction
  • Shakespeare’s reception history
  • Quotation, intertextuality and adaptation
  • Cultural value and cultural policy

Find out more - our PhD English Literature  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Professor Valerie Rumbold

Professor Valerie Rumbold

Chair in English Literature

Department of English Literature

My main enthusiasm is for eighteenth-century poetry and satire, particularly the work of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift, and I have a special interest in textual editing, having produced, over the last few years, editions of Pope’s Dunciad and of hoaxes and parodies by Swift.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 5692
Email
v.rumbold@bham.ac.uk

Dr Manu Sehgal

Lecturer in South Asian History

Department of History

I am historian of colonial South Asia with particular interest in the political and social history of the British empire. My work explores the critical importance of territorial contestation in shaping colonial rule during the long eighteenth century and articulations of sovereignty in colonial South Asia. I am also interested in gender history and law across the British empire

Email
m.sehgal@bham.ac.uk

Dr Kate Smith

Dr Kate Smith

Senior Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century History

Department of History

I am an historian of eighteenth-century Britain and empire, with a particular interest in material cultures, production, consumption, skill, the senses and the emotions.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 4145756
Email
k.smith@bham.ac.uk

Kate encourages contact from potential postgraduate students considering working on the following areas: eighteenth-century British material culture, women, domestic spaces, property, emotions, the senses, trade, consumption, manufacturing or skill.


Find out more - our PhD History  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Leonard David Smith

Dr Leonard David Smith

Honorary Senior Research Fellow

Institute of Applied Health Research

Leonard Smith is a social historian with a special interest in the history of psychiatry and mental health institutions from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. His research has focussed primarily on England and the former British West Indian colonies. It encompasses the development of both private madhouses and public lunatic asylums, those who established and managed them, and the ...

Email
l.d.smith@bham.ac.uk
Dr Smith is currently the co-supervisor for two people undertaking PhD study.

Professor Colin Timms

Emeritus Professor of Music

Department of Music

I am a musicologist specialising in Italian secular vocal music (opera and chamber cantata) of the late Baroque period, especially Agostino Steffani, and in the music of George Frideric Handel.

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 5782 (secretary)
Email
c.r.timms@bham.ac.uk

Successful Ph.D. dissertations on Thomas Morley as a Music Publisher, Schuetz’s Passion settings, the cantata spirituale e morale, Handel’s opera Poro, Domenico Dragonetti, Tchaikovsky’s songs and Rimsky-Korsakov’s operas.


Find out more - our Music postgraduate study  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Gillian Wright

Dr Gillian Wright

Reader in English and Irish Literature

Department of English Literature

I am a Reader in English and Irish Literature. My research and teaching focus on literature from the early modern period, and in particular on poetry, women’s writing, and book history and editing. I am a General Editor on the AHRC-funded Cambridge edition of The Works of Aphra Behn, for which I am editing Behn’s poetry. I also teach contemporary Irish fiction. 

Telephone
+44 (0)121 414 5671
Email
g.wright@bham.ac.uk

I welcome applications relating to early modern English and Irish literature, and am especially interested in supervising Masters and doctoral projects on women’s writing (particularly Aphra Behn), Restoration poetry, and book history.


Find out more - our PhD English Literature  page has information about doctoral research at the University of Birmingham.

Doctoral researchers

Name

Department/Affiliation

Research interests

Rebekah Andrew

English, Drama, American and Canadian Studies (EDACS)

Biblical references, eighteenth-century novels

Samantha Armstrong

History

kindness, eighteenth-century, women, England

Ian Cook

Philosophy and Religion

Eighteenth century, Iron industry, Quakers, population, society

Andy Fincham

Philosophy and Religion

social history, economics, Quaker, business, ethics 

Aurora Martinez

English Literature

Pastoral, Satire, Genre, Historicism, Poetry

Gemma Masson

CBOMGS

ottoman, eighteenth century, janissaries, Istanbul

Elaine Mitchell

History

 

Tom Rusbridge

History

Material culture, consumption, making, domestic objects

Laverne Young Smith

History

Colonial Virginia, Baptist, Anglican, toleration