Emergency politics and the obligation of securitizing actors

Location
ERI 149
Category
Arts and Law, Research
Dates
Wednesday 30th January 2019 (15:15-17:00)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)
Contact

Contact the Academic Events Organiser of the Centre for further information: globalethicsevents@contacts.bham.ac.uk

Dr Rita Floyd (University of Birmingham)

Rita (PhD, 2010 Warwick) is Lecturer in Conflict and Security in the Department of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham. 

She was previously a Birmingham Fellow in Conflict and Security at UoB, and before then British Academy Post-doctoral and ESRC Post-doctoral Fellow (both at The University of Warwick). She is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles on security theory, environmental security and ethics and security. She is the author of Security and the Environment: Securitisation Theory and US Environmental Security Policy (CUP, 2010). Her second monograph entitled The Morality of Security: A Theory of just securitization is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press in 2019. This book offers a new way of approaching ethics and security by bringing together insights from moral philosophy via the just war tradition, and Security Studies via securitization theory. This book develops principles of just securitization concerned exclusively with when securitization (i.e. the use of emergency politics whereby putative threats are addressed using exceptional means) is morally permissible

Please find the abstract of Rita’s talk in this document

From January 2019 to January 2020 Rita will commence a prestigious Independent and Social Research Foundation Mid-career Fellowship awarded for her project Emergency politics: security, threats and the duties of states. This project aims to take Rita’s work on ethics and security further, it aims to unpick when securitization is morally required, tackling issues such as culpability in threat creation and the obligation to securitize. Whilst this project is ultimately intended as a research monograph in its own right, it builds logically on the assumptions of Floyd’s existing work on just securitization. After all, a theory of the obligation to securitize must begin by thinking about the permissibility to do, as one can only have a duty to perform acts (i.e. securitization) that are permissible.

This seminar is part of the 2018-19 Global Ethics Tea Seminar Series hosted by the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics.

The talk will start at 15h15, but please join us for tea and cake from 14h00.

Venue:  ERI Building room 149