Cybercrime workshop: Police Knowledge fund

Location
Allan Walters Building
Category
Research, Social Sciences
Dates
Monday 19th September 2016 (09:30-16:15)
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Speakers

Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay, David Hicks, Nir Tolkovsky, Craig Hughes, DI Rob Harris, DCI Sean Paley, David Benford and Tom Chothia.

Registration

You can register for this event by completing our short online form.

The aim of this cybercrime workshop will be to identify pathways for interdisciplinary research and practice to better understand, prevent, and systematically unpack cybercrime problems.  A central focus will be how to support investigators in the law enforcement and corporate/private sector.  We want to build a network of mutual support between investigators, related practitioners and researchers to develop our shared interests in integrated approaches to digital investigation and intelligence.

Agenda

09:30 – 10:00: Event Registration and Coffee/Tea

10:00 – 10:15: Event Opening and Introduction with Dr Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay

10:15 – 11:00: Crime Scripting with Dr David Hicks and Mr Nir Tolkovsky

This talk will focus on applying crime scripting to the target cybercrime problems of denial of service attacks and computer services/software fraud.  The aim of the script is to unpack the nature of the underlying offences and offending, and to identify intervention points for investigators.

11:00 – 11:30: The Police Practitioner View with DI Rob Harris and DCI Sean Paley

The challenge for policing in a digital world. This talk will look at the challenges facing law enforcement in responding to the changes in crime and offending over the last few years. Providing an overview of the impact the National Cyber Security Strategy has had on policing structures, and the subsequent response to this evolving threat.

11:30 – 12:00: Coffee/Tea Break

12:00 – 12:30: TCP/IP and Digital Evidence with Mr Nir Tolkovsky

Introducing key terms and concepts of the TCP/IP protocol, this presentation will elaborate on the dynamic properties associated with digital crime in the context of DRIPA 2014 (under judicial review), open source information, digital forensics and log analysis.   Incorporating these dynamic elements into the investigative tool box offers further opportunities to access powers and to demystify some of the elements of cybercrime.

12:30 – 13:00: Proceeds of Crime and Proceeds for Crime with Mr Craig Hughes

This presentation will focus on financial investigation and possibilities for its integration with digital investigation and intelligence. The key drivers for cybercrime will often relate to money and other forms of benefit.  There appears to be scope to apply financial investigation powers to target criminal property and benefit associated with digital crime.

13:00 – 13:45: Lunch

13:45 – 14:45: Open Source with Mr David Benford

This presentation will show examples of actual crimes carried out by use of modus operandi (MOs) such as fake domains, fake emails and utilisation of social media for accurate intelligence.  Social media is becoming an increasingly powerful tool for law enforcement for investigating the planning or execution of criminal activity. Conversely, criminals are also becoming increasingly adept at utilising such media for the planning of crime and the targeting of both individuals and organisations, especially for the purpose of financial crime. 

14:45 – 15:00: Coffee/Tea Break

15:00 – 15:45: Panel Discussion

Through audience participation, and discussion with members of the panel, the aim of this cybercrime workshop will be to identify pathways for interdisciplinary research and practice to better understand, prevent, and systematically unpack cybercrime problems.  A central focus will be how to support investigators in the law enforcement and corporate/private sector.  We want to build a network of mutual support between investigators, related practitioners and researchers to develop our shared interests in integrated approaches to digital investigation and intelligence.

16:15: Event Close

About the Speakers: 

Dr Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay PhD

Reader in Economics, Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham

Siddhartha is an internationally recognised economist in the field of political economy and public policy.  He has a particular interest in the economics of crime and economic evaluation of policy. His research interests in this area includes game theoretic modelling of criminal behaviour, econometric (statistical) analysis of factors determining crime, cost benefit analysis of alternate interventions, and the impact of initiatives such as citizen reporting. Siddhartha is the lead economist on a number of externally funded projects that includes the Police Knowledge Fund (jointly funded by HEFCE and the Home office via the College of Policing) and another funded by Norfolk and Suffolk constabulary (see Recent Grants under Research). He is the co-director of the newly formed Centre for Crime, Justice and Policing at the University of Birmingham. 

Mr David Benford MSc

Managing Director, Blackstage Forensics Limited, Visiting Professional Fellow, Department of Law, Criminology and Social Sciences, University of Derby

David Benford is renowned as a leading expert on hostile profiling through social media and emerging technologies, and is the UK-based managing director and principal consultant of digital forensic and cybercrime specialists Blackstage Forensics. He is a special officer with UK law enforcement and is a Visiting Professional Fellow at the University of Derby. David works internationally with military, diplomats, corporations and law enforcement agencies and is especially well known for his work with the European diplomatic institutions in Brussels and logistics industries. 

Dr Tom Chothia

Senior Lecturer, Computer Science, University of Birmingham

Tom Chothia is a Senior Lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. His research involves the development of new mathematical analysis techniques, and the application of these techniques to cyber security problems. 

DI Rob Harris

West Midlands Police Regional Organised Crime Unit (ROCU), Regional Cyber Crime Unit

Rob is a Warwickshire Police officer, currently working on the Regional Organised Crime Unit for the West Midlands with a responsibility for Cyber Crime. Having started his policing career in 1989 he has worked in a number of roles from uniformed policing to criminal investigation, and specialist teams such as financial investigation and high tech crime. With experience of roles in a local, regional and national capacities Rob has many years of law enforcement experience across different policing organisations. 

Dr David Hicks PhD

Senior Lecturer, Department of Law, Criminology and Social Sciences, University of Derby

David is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Head of Research in Postgraduate Criminology, and also MSc Criminal Investigation Programme at the University of Derby. He has over two decades of academic, research and professional experience. This includes national and international recognition as a specialist in financial crime and financial investigation, criminal/financial intelligence, organised crime, and crime prevention. He also has experience lecturing in criminology at Cardiff University (Wales) and the University of Ottawa (Canada).  David is the co-principal investigator for the Better Policing Collaborative (BPC) cybercrime project sponsored by the Police Knowledge Fund (PKF), which is jointly funded by HEFCE and the Home Office via the College of Policing. 

Mr Craig Hughes MA, (PhD Candidate)

Associate Lecturer, Department of Law, Criminology and Social Sciences, University of Derby

Craig has been involved in law enforcement for over thirty years.  The last 20 of which he has been a financial investigator and manager at regional and national levels for the Police and Home Office departments and, most recently, the Serious Fraud Office. Craig was part of the Implementation Team for the set up of the Assets Recovery Agency in 2002.  He is currently researching a PhD on the nature of financial investigation within the UK, and is an Associate Lecturer on the MSc Criminal Investigation programme at the University of Derby. 

DCI Sean Paley LLB

Warwickshire Police & West Mercia Police, Specialist Operations & Protective Services

Sean is the current holder of the Cyber Portfolio for West Mercia Police and Warwickshire Police. Having started his Policing career in 1988, he has worked mainly in CID, carrying out the role of SIO on Major Crime and now Kidnap and Extortion, and local area Crime Manager roles across the Force. He is a member of the National Open Source Working Group, and the People and Skills working group for Digital Intelligence and Investigation. 

Mr Nir Tolkovsky MSc, CFE, (PhD Candidate)

Associate Lecturer, Department of Law, Criminology and Social Sciences, University of Derby

Nir is an Associate Lecturer on the MSc Criminal Investigation programme at the University of Derby, and a final year PhD candidate.  His background includes counter-terrorism and counter-proliferation project management within the Israeli Intelligence community, and research and development in the private sector and academia in the UK.   Among his recent engagements are projects utilising a variety of analytical disciplines in criminal justice systems, security and commercial contexts, ranging from cyber intelligence analysis to complex corporate fraud litigation and electronic discovery.  Nir’s doctoral research addresses the interplay between ‘criminal’ and a range of ‘commercial’ and ‘civil’ fraud resolution mechanisms in English law and practice.