Nanomaterials and Food Safety - Division of Food Safety

Location
University of Birmingham
Category
Engineering and Physical Sciences, Lectures Talks and Workshops, Research, Students, Teaching
Dates
Wednesday 3rd December 2014 (09:00-17:00)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)
Contact

Gillian Burrows
Email: g.burrows@bham.ac.uk
Direct line: (+44) (0) 121 414 9151

A one day seminar on 03 December 2014 at the University of Birmingham

A seminar will be held at the University of Birmingham, examining the issues associated with the introduction of nanomaterials in food production and general food safety.

In view of the increasing use of nanomaterial compounds/nanotechnology in food several questions will be addressed:

  • Are these products hazardous for human health?
  • Can they be detected and how?
  • Can foodborne pathogens become resistant against nanomaterials?
  • Is there any risk of an increased bacterial resistance?

Currently, products that contain forms of nanomaterials are difficult to track because of being marketed under brand names and lack of labelling regulations. Consumer exposure depends on the type of the nanomaterial, the part of food processing and the manipulation of the product.

This seminar will cover new and current developments including the perspectives of food authorities, approaches followed by the industry and applied research.

The course will cover the following key areas:

  • A review of current and projected nanotechnology-derived food ingredients and additives relevant to food production and safety
  • Potential implications for consumer safety and regulatory controls.
  • Approaches to control including typical barriers and limitations

Speakers will be from government organisations, the food industry and academia including:

  • Nanomaterials and nanotechnology in food: Dr. Qasim Chaudhry - The Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA)   
  • Analysis and detection: Prof Eva Valsami-Jones, Chair in Environmental Nanoscience, Director of FENAC, University of Birmingham
  • Toxicity: Dr Hanene Ali-Boucetta, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical School, University of Birmingham
  • Microbiological (food safety) implications: Dr Kostas Gkatzionis, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham

This seminar will be of importance to EH practitioners from industry and local government, safety/quality managers from industry and food business operators.

Timetable: To be confirmed

Seminar Fee: £110 per delegate (to include lunch and refreshments)

We reserve the right to make changes without further notice.

Student looking into microscope