Rhiannon Cogbill

Rhiannon Cogbill

Department of English Literature
Doctoral researcher

Contact details

Phd title: Unhealth in the Novels of Virginia Woolf, Dorothy Richardson and May Sinclair
SupervisorsProfessor Deborah Longworth (University of Birmingham), Dr Melissa Dickson (University of Birmingham) and Dr Claire Brock (University of Leicester)
PhD English Literature

Qualifications

  • BA English (First-Class Honours), University of Birmingham, 2015
  • MA Literature and Culture (Distinction), University of Birmingham, 2016

Biography

I first graduated from the University of Birmingham in 2015 with a BA in English, receiving first-class honours and the Tibbatt’s Memorial Prize. I subsequently graduated with an MA in Literature and Culture, for which I received Distinction and was funded by the University of Birmingham’s George Henry Marshall Postgraduate Scholarship. My MA dissertation explored the figure of the ill woman in a selection of novels by ‘modern Victorian’ writer May Sinclair and was a point of departure for my PhD research, which I commenced in 2016 with a Midlands4Cities AHRC Studentship.

Teaching

• ‘Victorian Literature’ Second-Year Postgraduate Teaching Assistant, University of Birmingham, 2019-20
• ‘English in Your Subject’ Seminar Tutor, Birmingham International Academy, 2018-19
• ‘Introduction to English Literature 1790 – Present’ First-Year Postgraduate Teaching Assistant, University of Birmingham, 2018-19
• ‘English in Your Subject’ Seminar Tutor, Birmingham International Academy, 2017-18

I am currently working towards Associate Fellowship of Advance HE (formerly the Higher Education Academy).

Research

My doctoral thesis is an examination of the social, cultural and political relationships between women and unhealth in the work of three key early twentieth-century women writers: Virginia Woolf, Dorothy Richardson and May Sinclair. I examine how the concept of unhealth, which I use to encompass medicalized disease, affective illness and culturally mediated sickness, becomes so closely associated with women and womanhood in these writers’ novels. This project is situated at the intersection of modernist studies and medical humanities, and further engages with disability studies.