Quarantine Quartos

Just as the closure of the London playhouses by bubonic plague obliged Shakespeare to go into isolation in the early 1590s and write Venus and Adonis, so the coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has obliged Shakespeare Institute faculty to stay away from the seminar rooms and rehearsal spaces of Stratford and discuss their research from their own homes.  

In connection with her acceptance of the 2020 Pragnell Prize, Michael Dobson, Director of the Shakespeare Institute, recorded an interview with Juliet Stevenson, in which she discusses some of the performances she gave at the RSC from the late 1970s through the mid 1980s. A short video extract is below to pique your interest and the full interview is available as a podcast to listen to at your leisure. 

Europe's National Poet: Shakespeare and Non-English Patriotism

In this 30-minute illustrated talk, the Director of the Shakespeare Institute considers Shakespeare's status on the European mainland. How is it that a writer regarded on this side of the Channel as Britain's national property should have been embraced so warmly in other countries, and how come they have some the best monuments and theatres dedicated to him into the bargain?

Previous quarantine quartos

 

An interview with Juliet Stevenson

In connection with her acceptance of the 2020 Pragnell Prize, Michael Dobson, Director of the Shakespeare Institute, recorded an interview with Juliet Stevenson, in which she discusses some of the performances she gave at the RSC from the late 1970s through the mid 1980s. A short video extract is below to pique your interest and the full interview is available as a podcast to listen to at your leisure. 

Michael Dobson: As You Like It

Professor Michael Dobson discusses why As You Like It is his favourite Shakespeare play.


Ewan Fernie: Twelfth Night

Professor Ewan Fernie discusses his love for Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night'.

The Archaeology of Shakespeare's Magic: Macbeth in a Bottle

Dr Chris Laoutaris of the Shakespeare Institute explores what the archaeological evidence of Renaissance magic, witchcraft and superstitious practices might tell us about Shakespeare's Macbeth.


Live-streaming Shakespearean performance

Here is Dr Erin Sullivan, taking the occasion of a period when the only theatre to be seen is to be seen online to consider her own research about the live-streaming of Shakespearean performance.