Developing new teachers: what does the research tell us?

Location
Room G39, School of Birmingham
Category
Social Sciences
Dates
Wednesday 17th May 2017 (17:00-18:30)
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Contact

Lynn Goode: l.m.goode@bham.ac.uk

Speakers

  • Monica Mincu, Associate Professor of Comparative Education, University of Torino
    Tensions between training and teaching in school direct salaried: alternative preparation under market accountability in England
  • Rachel Lofthouse, University of Newcastle; Professor Peter Davies, University of Birmingham;

    Dan Davies, Cardiff Metropolitan University; Celia Greenway, University of Birmingham.
    New professionals in formation: how do student teachers conceptualize their own learning?

Please register online if you wish to attend.

Abstracts

Tensions between training and teaching in school direct salaried: alternative preparation under market accountability in England

This article investigates an employment route to teacher education in England with no university input. English policies have established a market of both public and private providers. In addition, the hierarchical and market accountability of the English education system profoundly influences the organisation and institutional culture of school-based training. This study investigates an employment-based route delivered collaboratively by a teaching school together with a local consortium of schools (School-Centred Initial Teacher Training, or SCITT). I will argue that a culture of performance, not mitigated by the interplay of a partnership with a university, severely impacts upon the idea of preparation, especially in the case of the School Direct Salaried (SDS) scheme. Thus, the pressures derived from a performance-oriented system are at odds with teacher training and generate serious tensions.

New professionals in formation: how do student teachers conceptualize their own learning?

We examine how beginning teachers in the UK conceptualise their own learning to teach, using the 'Conceptual Change' approach (Vosniadou, 2013). Our sample of 37 from three university centres  includes primary and secondary beginning teachers (BTs) on undergraduate and postgraduate routes, and a new school-based route into teaching ('School Direct').  We conducted interviews in the middle and at the end of their programme. We identified six dimensions within BTs’ conceptions of learning to teach. A high degree of self-determination was associated with reflection on ‘being a teacher’ and a view of knowledge for teaching as uncertain. Many student teachers did not appear to change their conception at all and others regressed from a more complex conception to being recipients of 'good ideas'.  This matters for teacher educators who we believe should pay careful attention to what they are encouraging student teachers to focus on in their reflection and should aim to create conditions for learning in which student teachers experience co-construction